nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I mean, I'll try to post every day. ;)

Uh... what so far...

I'magonna finish [profile] rvqavalon's petticoat today, and pack it up and the green batiste to ship back tomorrow. (I'll also get the envelope chemise printed on wide paper while I'm out.) I also printed out some closeups of the beading patterns on the robe de style. So the plan for the weekend:

1. Finish petticoat.
2. Box up petticoat and batiste.
3. Take to the post office.
4. Get the envelope chemise printed.
5. Make the 1920s bandeau.
6. Fit the robe de style bodice.
7. Draft templates for the beading areas.
8. Sketch at least one beading pattern.
9. Make the pannier.
10. Order the rest of the crepe de chine and some extra lawn from Dharma.
11. Draft the skirt.
12. Make the 1910s brassiere.
13. Assemble the 1910s corset (as far as possible until the busk/boning arrives).
14. Learn the new sewing machine feet: ruffler, tucker, and hemstitcher.
15. Make 1810s strapped petticoat from pimatex.
16. Start on beading a test piece.
17. Gather pieces for 1780s shift and cut neckline.
18. Wait to finish corset before drafting/cutting the princess slip, the petticoat, and the negligee.

...um, not all of that is for the weekend. But this is what we call, in my line of work, The Path Forward. Feels good to have it written down!


In other news, I'm starving. And it's 4:30 PM. Time to raid the refrigerator and not spoil my dinner.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Regency)


Atlanta announced the Historical Costume Inspiration Festival back in June, after I had already begun work on a handsewn Regency ensemble. What fortunate timing!

Inspiration )




Research Resources )


Ensemble )


Materials and Sources )


Construction )


Accessories )


Completion - Pictures! )

5006725450_2e5b4d6b48_b_cropped
Photo by Kaycee Harding

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Regency)


Atlanta announced the Historical Costume Inspiration Festival back in June, after I had already begun work on a handsewn Regency ensemble. What fortunate timing!

Inspiration )




Research Resources )


Ensemble )


Materials and Sources )


Construction )


Accessories )


Completion - Pictures! )

5006725450_2e5b4d6b48_b_cropped
Photo by Kaycee Harding

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (steampunk)
With help from [livejournal.com profile] mlsdesigns and [livejournal.com profile] rvqavalon, the petticoat bodice is completely done. SQUEE!  Well, except for ties. And maybe a drawstring, which I may not even bother with. We'll see.  The seams went a lot faster when I switched to a smaller needle than the slightly thicker one I'd bent on the stays. Drill is tough, but Pimatex is finer and tighter.  I got tired of using my teeth to pull the needle through every time!

I've also seamed the petticoat skirt panels, and started to draw threads to mark tucks.  I gave that up after 45 minutes and three threads into the narrower panel.  Sheesh.  I'll just watch closer and not worry if when my tucks end up slightly crooked, as always.

Friday [livejournal.com profile] ladylilac12 came over and worked on her stays.  She also gave me a much-needed reminder by asking when the DFWCG Steampunk Social actually was.  Next Saturday! Yikes!!!  I've done practically nothing except troll for things on ebay.  I won a neato combination thermometer/hygrometer, but anything I win after now is very questionable to arrive in time for Saturday.  I really, really need some kind of a notebook or clipboard.  I have a plain wooden pencil - although an antique/vintage mechanical would be perfect but again, no time now - but I'm vague on what to do for the notebook itself.  Any ideas?  I'm also going to swipe Byron's field glasses, if he'll let me.  Nathan's vintage green goggles really are just sunglasses with side pieces. From the front they look completely vintage and not at all like goggles, so I'm leaning toward not using them.  I really need more gear, but this is just not an area I'm used to come up with ideas in!

As for the costume itself, though, that's under control.  Today I dyed a square yard of silk gauze with Rit, and it's the perfect color green.   It looks absolutely smashing with the white pith helmet!  \o/  I'm going with the blue-and-white striped petticoat for an underskirt, too. The poll was dead even between it and and the white tucked one; but I"m uncomfortable with having a white petti show like that.  Plus I just starched it so it's massively stiff, and I'd have to shorten it so the tucks are still at the hem.  The blue and white I can just turn up, and it's not starched.

I also got brown twill tape from Joann to make the skirt elevator.  1/2" for the loops, and 1" for the waistband.  I wanted a Sam Brown belt like this one, but it's jumping out of my price range right now and couldn't possibly be here on time if I did get it.  And I think I'm not going for the puttees this time; I just don't have time to experiment.  I'm going to try Byron's smaller WWII leggings over my boots and blue stockings, though.  It will be a somewhat startling look, but I want to try it. 
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (steampunk)
With help from [livejournal.com profile] mlsdesigns and [livejournal.com profile] rvqavalon, the petticoat bodice is completely done. SQUEE!  Well, except for ties. And maybe a drawstring, which I may not even bother with. We'll see.  The seams went a lot faster when I switched to a smaller needle than the slightly thicker one I'd bent on the stays. Drill is tough, but Pimatex is finer and tighter.  I got tired of using my teeth to pull the needle through every time!

I've also seamed the petticoat skirt panels, and started to draw threads to mark tucks.  I gave that up after 45 minutes and three threads into the narrower panel.  Sheesh.  I'll just watch closer and not worry if when my tucks end up slightly crooked, as always.

Friday [livejournal.com profile] ladylilac12 came over and worked on her stays.  She also gave me a much-needed reminder by asking when the DFWCG Steampunk Social actually was.  Next Saturday! Yikes!!!  I've done practically nothing except troll for things on ebay.  I won a neato combination thermometer/hygrometer, but anything I win after now is very questionable to arrive in time for Saturday.  I really, really need some kind of a notebook or clipboard.  I have a plain wooden pencil - although an antique/vintage mechanical would be perfect but again, no time now - but I'm vague on what to do for the notebook itself.  Any ideas?  I'm also going to swipe Byron's field glasses, if he'll let me.  Nathan's vintage green goggles really are just sunglasses with side pieces. From the front they look completely vintage and not at all like goggles, so I'm leaning toward not using them.  I really need more gear, but this is just not an area I'm used to come up with ideas in!

As for the costume itself, though, that's under control.  Today I dyed a square yard of silk gauze with Rit, and it's the perfect color green.   It looks absolutely smashing with the white pith helmet!  \o/  I'm going with the blue-and-white striped petticoat for an underskirt, too. The poll was dead even between it and and the white tucked one; but I"m uncomfortable with having a white petti show like that.  Plus I just starched it so it's massively stiff, and I'd have to shorten it so the tucks are still at the hem.  The blue and white I can just turn up, and it's not starched.

I also got brown twill tape from Joann to make the skirt elevator.  1/2" for the loops, and 1" for the waistband.  I wanted a Sam Brown belt like this one, but it's jumping out of my price range right now and couldn't possibly be here on time if I did get it.  And I think I'm not going for the puttees this time; I just don't have time to experiment.  I'm going to try Byron's smaller WWII leggings over my boots and blue stockings, though.  It will be a somewhat startling look, but I want to try it. 
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (puzzled)
I'm getting ready to cut and sew together my first mockup for the S&S short stays. I've read through the construction order for both them and for the Mantua Maker long stays pattern. Both say to fully assemble each layer individually, including the gussets.

Is this typical for construction of the period?  I cut my teeth (so to speak) on 1860s sewing, in which flat-lining is fundamental for strength.  Even my 18th-century stays, which I did by machine and not by the nifty handseaming techniques, had me treat the interlining and cover fabrics as one piece for assembly.

So doing these stays, and particularly the gussets, in individual layers just sounds wrong to me; although I could be totally off base. And I don't have any books or museum pictures with enough detail to tell if it's right or not.  I just want to know how it was really done! Help!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (puzzled)
I'm getting ready to cut and sew together my first mockup for the S&S short stays. I've read through the construction order for both them and for the Mantua Maker long stays pattern. Both say to fully assemble each layer individually, including the gussets.

Is this typical for construction of the period?  I cut my teeth (so to speak) on 1860s sewing, in which flat-lining is fundamental for strength.  Even my 18th-century stays, which I did by machine and not by the nifty handseaming techniques, had me treat the interlining and cover fabrics as one piece for assembly.

So doing these stays, and particularly the gussets, in individual layers just sounds wrong to me; although I could be totally off base. And I don't have any books or museum pictures with enough detail to tell if it's right or not.  I just want to know how it was really done! Help!
nuranar: (annoyance)
I went ahead and cut out two shifts (one for me, one for M.) on Monday night. I'm going to seam the back on mine because I hate how much fabric is wasted with the S&S cutting layout. Grr.  When I do my 18th century shift, I'm using the cutting layout from Costume Close-Up. That looks so neat.

I ordered the Mantua Maker drawers pattern. I also threw in the long stays pattern in as well, because I've been eyeing it for years anyway. I guess she's based in Texas - better be, because I had to pay sales tax!

And I also bought white drill from Hobby Lobby to make short stays. I wish I'd know or thought to check there, back when I was getting supplies for Atlanta to make my 1860s corset. Then I'd have an all-white corset, instead of white sateen cover and unbleached drill inside! :p


I'm still up in the air about what to use for the petticoat skirts, though.  I'm using Pimatex for the bodices, but the skirts are holding me up.

While at Hobby Lobby, I checked their Kona cotton. It is the famed Robert Kaufman stuff, just like what I remembered at Joann, and I still don't like it! :/  I tried, I really tried. But it looks coarse, it feels heavy and non-drapey, and feels rough to me.  I'm sure it's great for quilting and more ordinary clothing, for sure.  Keep in mind that I've been working with nothing but pimatex and lawn and voile for a long while, too.  I went back to Dharma Trading Co., too, trying to find some more info. (Unfortunately, they didn't have batiste to compare, or buy.)

Pimatex:        3.7 oz/sq yd       thread count 133x72
Broadcloth:   3.5 oz/sq yd       thread count 133x72
Lawn:           2.5 oz/sq yd        thread count 90x88
Voile:            1.9 oz/sq yd       thread count 80x72
Muslin*:        4.0 oz/sq yd       thread count 78x78
Kona:            4.4 oz/sq yd       thread count 60x60

It's not just me being prejudiced; Kona really is both heavier and coarser than what I want to use for these petticoats. It's heavier and coarser (slightly) than even Dharma's "economy" muslin.  To be sure, that's a good thing when one needs a sturdy medium-weight cotton.  But not for Regency petticoats.

So I really don't want to use Kona.  I can use the Pimatex I have on hand, if it comes down to it, although I really want something not so crisp for the skirts.  I've got loads of fine voile, thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jaelie, but I'm afraid it's too light to really be effective.    I think batiste or lawn would be ideal. However, I've found it only for $8-10/yd.  Does anyone have any cheaper sources to suggest?  Besides Dharma, I've checked Martha Pullen, Farmhouse Fabrics, and Baltazor. Which last has $6/yd "Nainsook," sounding awesomely old-fashioned, but is supposedly lighter than batiste. Will it still be less translucent than voile?

I hate to sound a skinflint, but I'd really rather save a couple dollars a yard and spend them towards fine stockings or something. :D (Speaking of, are any of B&T's silk stockings a good idea for this?)
nuranar: (annoyance)
I went ahead and cut out two shifts (one for me, one for M.) on Monday night. I'm going to seam the back on mine because I hate how much fabric is wasted with the S&S cutting layout. Grr.  When I do my 18th century shift, I'm using the cutting layout from Costume Close-Up. That looks so neat.

I ordered the Mantua Maker drawers pattern. I also threw in the long stays pattern in as well, because I've been eyeing it for years anyway. I guess she's based in Texas - better be, because I had to pay sales tax!

And I also bought white drill from Hobby Lobby to make short stays. I wish I'd know or thought to check there, back when I was getting supplies for Atlanta to make my 1860s corset. Then I'd have an all-white corset, instead of white sateen cover and unbleached drill inside! :p


I'm still up in the air about what to use for the petticoat skirts, though.  I'm using Pimatex for the bodices, but the skirts are holding me up.

While at Hobby Lobby, I checked their Kona cotton. It is the famed Robert Kaufman stuff, just like what I remembered at Joann, and I still don't like it! :/  I tried, I really tried. But it looks coarse, it feels heavy and non-drapey, and feels rough to me.  I'm sure it's great for quilting and more ordinary clothing, for sure.  Keep in mind that I've been working with nothing but pimatex and lawn and voile for a long while, too.  I went back to Dharma Trading Co., too, trying to find some more info. (Unfortunately, they didn't have batiste to compare, or buy.)

Pimatex:        3.7 oz/sq yd       thread count 133x72
Broadcloth:   3.5 oz/sq yd       thread count 133x72
Lawn:           2.5 oz/sq yd        thread count 90x88
Voile:            1.9 oz/sq yd       thread count 80x72
Muslin*:        4.0 oz/sq yd       thread count 78x78
Kona:            4.4 oz/sq yd       thread count 60x60

It's not just me being prejudiced; Kona really is both heavier and coarser than what I want to use for these petticoats. It's heavier and coarser (slightly) than even Dharma's "economy" muslin.  To be sure, that's a good thing when one needs a sturdy medium-weight cotton.  But not for Regency petticoats.

So I really don't want to use Kona.  I can use the Pimatex I have on hand, if it comes down to it, although I really want something not so crisp for the skirts.  I've got loads of fine voile, thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jaelie, but I'm afraid it's too light to really be effective.    I think batiste or lawn would be ideal. However, I've found it only for $8-10/yd.  Does anyone have any cheaper sources to suggest?  Besides Dharma, I've checked Martha Pullen, Farmhouse Fabrics, and Baltazor. Which last has $6/yd "Nainsook," sounding awesomely old-fashioned, but is supposedly lighter than batiste. Will it still be less translucent than voile?

I hate to sound a skinflint, but I'd really rather save a couple dollars a yard and spend them towards fine stockings or something. :D (Speaking of, are any of B&T's silk stockings a good idea for this?)

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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