nuranar: (sewing)
Star dress pictures!

The fabrics. White silk taffeta, and blue silk taffeta - white or silver one way, teal the other way. I think it's what [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat used for her Marie Antoinette dress, and it's gorgeous. I only got 2 yards, and I'm afraid to look to see if they have more. I absolutely don't need a stash of silk taffeta (Expense! Money! Ahhh!) but man.



Read more... )
nuranar: (sewing)
Star dress pictures!

The fabrics. White silk taffeta, and blue silk taffeta - white or silver one way, teal the other way. I think it's what [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat used for her Marie Antoinette dress, and it's gorgeous. I only got 2 yards, and I'm afraid to look to see if they have more. I absolutely don't need a stash of silk taffeta (Expense! Money! Ahhh!) but man.



Read more... )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1930s)
Thank all of you SO MUCH for the sympathy, reassurance, and advice on my Jampagne crisis.  As [livejournal.com profile] suededsilk pointed out, I really had made up my mind by the time I finished writing the post.  But affirmation means a lot to me, and you really came through.

As a result, I sewed most of my long weekend and got a lot done on the Star dress.  I felt so energized to not have the 1915 hanging over the head!  But maybe I overdid it and kind of burnt out on Sunday afternoon. But I now have:

* Organza overskirt construction done (all by hand, including gathering and rolled hem).
* Taffeta underskirt construction done (all but side seams by hand).
* Blue taffeta bodice basic construction done.
 - Darts sewn, seams sewn, boning channels and casings sewn.
* Blue taffeta bands seamed together and edges ironed under to trim the underskirt

I also ordered the last bit of organza for the sleeves (which are patterned and will need very little sewing) and flat boning for the bodice.

Oh, and I've officially bled on the project. A tiny pinprick of blood, right on top of one of the taffeta pleats, as I was basting the pleats together. :p

I have musical rehearsal tonight, and I'll try to get a start on sewing the wide blue band to the underskirt. I could have done this in sections with the skirt construction, but I'd rather be able to remove the blue band and use it as a plain, full-length underskirt in the future.

So what's left?

* Cutting blue taffeta bias strips for piping, shoe rosettes, and headdress. Any idea how much bias is needed for shoe rosettes?
* Cutting a "modesty panel" strip for under the lacing. I wasn't going to do this until I saw one on an original.
* Making and applying said piping. Not a big deal!
* Eyelets in the back. That might take longer. I'm much better at piping than at eyelets.
* Cutting, seaming, and sewing in the sleeves.
* Draping the bertha.
* Tucker, rosettes, and headdress.

What do you all use for ballgown lacing? Narrow ribbon? And how much?
I also need to order foil stars and a tucker kit. [livejournal.com profile] rvqavalon, tell me again where you got yours?


Now for the not-Jampagne dress!

This one began just as I searched for ideas.  I didn't want to MAKE anything happen for this. If it fell together, fine, I'd run with it. Otherwise, I'd wear something else.  I didn't want to have to buy a pattern, although I was okay with buying fabric since there's nothing in the stash I wanted to use on this.

And I do want to wear this hat:





First thing I pulled out was this pattern. I've made it a couple years ago, as the "ditzy print dress" (which I don't think I have finished pictures of). That version is cute enough, but I made it with a shorter skirt so it wouldn't be too weird for modern wear.  More importantly, it's very simple to put together, sized generously (take note for any of you who haven't tried New York Patterns), and will be all around cool, cute, and comfortable. What more could I ask for? :)



Then I wandered to Reproduction Fabrics to see if anything caught my eye. Criteria: it must be a truly vintage-style pattern, not vintage-esque, and not a color scheme based on cream, gold, or orange. This is me setting High Standards to keep from making something happen in the face of fate.

Well, whaddya know! This one pretty much bowled me over. I found plenty else I liked, but nothing else I loved the way I do this one. I have no idea who made it, and I can't find it anywhere else online, and it was Not Cheap even for a repro print, but I think it's awesome and it's mine. :D






I browsed my Sears Catalog books for inspiration, and decided to make up the New York pattern with white sleeves (they're raglan cut) to be a bit more sporty.  And on etsy I found a button and buckle set in yellow that *ought* to match. The bow I'd like to try, though I'm not sure yet what color or material.

I'd like to find gauntlet gloves, but trolling ebay and etsy is only turning up a handful of maybes. I've never bought gloves online.  My hands are very long, 7 1/2" fingertip to end of palm, with long slender fingers and a long narrow palm, just over 3" across.  Sometimes size 8 is definitely too big; size 7 1/2 can be tolerable. I've never had a pair of gloves that fit me perfectly.


And for a bonus I snagged this. Yes, it is a cream ground, but there were only 1.5 yards left and I figure it'll make a very cute blouse for later. Lady Adventurer with whimsy!
(FWIW, Grandma's Attic fabric online has it in three colorways; it's part of Windham's Sunbonnet Sue collection.)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1930s)
Thank all of you SO MUCH for the sympathy, reassurance, and advice on my Jampagne crisis.  As [livejournal.com profile] suededsilk pointed out, I really had made up my mind by the time I finished writing the post.  But affirmation means a lot to me, and you really came through.

As a result, I sewed most of my long weekend and got a lot done on the Star dress.  I felt so energized to not have the 1915 hanging over the head!  But maybe I overdid it and kind of burnt out on Sunday afternoon. But I now have:

* Organza overskirt construction done (all by hand, including gathering and rolled hem).
* Taffeta underskirt construction done (all but side seams by hand).
* Blue taffeta bodice basic construction done.
 - Darts sewn, seams sewn, boning channels and casings sewn.
* Blue taffeta bands seamed together and edges ironed under to trim the underskirt

I also ordered the last bit of organza for the sleeves (which are patterned and will need very little sewing) and flat boning for the bodice.

Oh, and I've officially bled on the project. A tiny pinprick of blood, right on top of one of the taffeta pleats, as I was basting the pleats together. :p

I have musical rehearsal tonight, and I'll try to get a start on sewing the wide blue band to the underskirt. I could have done this in sections with the skirt construction, but I'd rather be able to remove the blue band and use it as a plain, full-length underskirt in the future.

So what's left?

* Cutting blue taffeta bias strips for piping, shoe rosettes, and headdress. Any idea how much bias is needed for shoe rosettes?
* Cutting a "modesty panel" strip for under the lacing. I wasn't going to do this until I saw one on an original.
* Making and applying said piping. Not a big deal!
* Eyelets in the back. That might take longer. I'm much better at piping than at eyelets.
* Cutting, seaming, and sewing in the sleeves.
* Draping the bertha.
* Tucker, rosettes, and headdress.

What do you all use for ballgown lacing? Narrow ribbon? And how much?
I also need to order foil stars and a tucker kit. [livejournal.com profile] rvqavalon, tell me again where you got yours?


Now for the not-Jampagne dress!

This one began just as I searched for ideas.  I didn't want to MAKE anything happen for this. If it fell together, fine, I'd run with it. Otherwise, I'd wear something else.  I didn't want to have to buy a pattern, although I was okay with buying fabric since there's nothing in the stash I wanted to use on this.

And I do want to wear this hat:





First thing I pulled out was this pattern. I've made it a couple years ago, as the "ditzy print dress" (which I don't think I have finished pictures of). That version is cute enough, but I made it with a shorter skirt so it wouldn't be too weird for modern wear.  More importantly, it's very simple to put together, sized generously (take note for any of you who haven't tried New York Patterns), and will be all around cool, cute, and comfortable. What more could I ask for? :)



Then I wandered to Reproduction Fabrics to see if anything caught my eye. Criteria: it must be a truly vintage-style pattern, not vintage-esque, and not a color scheme based on cream, gold, or orange. This is me setting High Standards to keep from making something happen in the face of fate.

Well, whaddya know! This one pretty much bowled me over. I found plenty else I liked, but nothing else I loved the way I do this one. I have no idea who made it, and I can't find it anywhere else online, and it was Not Cheap even for a repro print, but I think it's awesome and it's mine. :D






I browsed my Sears Catalog books for inspiration, and decided to make up the New York pattern with white sleeves (they're raglan cut) to be a bit more sporty.  And on etsy I found a button and buckle set in yellow that *ought* to match. The bow I'd like to try, though I'm not sure yet what color or material.

I'd like to find gauntlet gloves, but trolling ebay and etsy is only turning up a handful of maybes. I've never bought gloves online.  My hands are very long, 7 1/2" fingertip to end of palm, with long slender fingers and a long narrow palm, just over 3" across.  Sometimes size 8 is definitely too big; size 7 1/2 can be tolerable. I've never had a pair of gloves that fit me perfectly.


And for a bonus I snagged this. Yes, it is a cream ground, but there were only 1.5 yards left and I figure it'll make a very cute blouse for later. Lady Adventurer with whimsy!
(FWIW, Grandma's Attic fabric online has it in three colorways; it's part of Windham's Sunbonnet Sue collection.)

Jampagne.

7 July 2011 08:53 am
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (worry)
Okay, who on my f-list besides [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat is definitely doing Jampagne at Costume College?  And if you are, are you doing 1910s, 1920s, or 1930s?


I have a really pretty 1915 outfit planned.  I also have only two and a half weeks to do it, finish the Gala dress (the 1860s Star) with accessories, and everything else I want to arrange.  Like changing up the white Regency a bit, and working on the 18th-century.

This is starting to look unattainable.

I freely admit I'm a perfectionist.  At the same time I'm naturally lazy. Those traits balance each other, and tend to result in pretty decent costumes.  Sometimes the balance slips to the perfectionism side, in which case I end up with the handsewn Regency and undies.  I'm immensely proud of that accomplishment. At the same time, I fully understand the cost of letting that one project take 2-3 months of sewing time.

At other times, the laziness triumphs a bit too long, and I end up with the 1770s-ish indienne print gown and ensemble.  It is super cute and I love to wear it, but the gown isalmost entirely machine sewn, skirt machine top-stitched and wholly unbalanced, and completely untrimmed.  The machine-sewn, unlined stays are still in the very slow process of being bound.  (I keep breaking the eyes off my leather needles - any ideas?)  The only items I'm truly proud of are the cap, fichu, and petticoat, which use correct materials and techniques.  I'm not stressing about the gown so much, but it looks unfinished and needs much hem fixing and possibly neckline tucks.  And it will never be quite the quality job that I would have liked.


What I'm getting at:  The 1915 dress is going to end up worse than the 1770s outfit.  Worse in that it will take every last second of sewing time, be less-carefully sewn and fitted, the corset will be slapdash and not fit as well as it could, and the hat, shoes, and stockings will be make-dos.  Overall, it will completely stress me out AND it won't be a finished project I'm really proud of.

So why am I doing it?

To be part of the Jampagne group?
 - Most people are doing 1920s.  1915 won't fit with that anyway.

To make a longed-for 1910s outfit, and have the undies to do more Edwardian in the future?
 - With so little time, I won't like what I end up with. It will all need redone anyway.


If I scrap set aside the 1915 stuff for a time, I could do so much more.  The Star is the really important one, for the Gala; and although it's 1860s, and I must do 1860s right, it's my home ground. It'll be awesome.  But I could maybe do an early 30s gown for Jampagne and call it good enough.  Then I could also work on the 18th century outfit and get that right. Maybe even finally get good shoes for it from B&T, instead of spending money on makeshift 1910s ones.  And I could trim the white Regency with color; I've seen a lot of plates that have fun trims on white dresses.  I'll have zero chance of doing any of that if I focus on the 1910s.

But it still seems pretty lame for participation in Jampagne.


What do you think?

Jampagne.

7 July 2011 08:53 am
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (worry)
Okay, who on my f-list besides [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat is definitely doing Jampagne at Costume College?  And if you are, are you doing 1910s, 1920s, or 1930s?


I have a really pretty 1915 outfit planned.  I also have only two and a half weeks to do it, finish the Gala dress (the 1860s Star) with accessories, and everything else I want to arrange.  Like changing up the white Regency a bit, and working on the 18th-century.

This is starting to look unattainable.

I freely admit I'm a perfectionist.  At the same time I'm naturally lazy. Those traits balance each other, and tend to result in pretty decent costumes.  Sometimes the balance slips to the perfectionism side, in which case I end up with the handsewn Regency and undies.  I'm immensely proud of that accomplishment. At the same time, I fully understand the cost of letting that one project take 2-3 months of sewing time.

At other times, the laziness triumphs a bit too long, and I end up with the 1770s-ish indienne print gown and ensemble.  It is super cute and I love to wear it, but the gown isalmost entirely machine sewn, skirt machine top-stitched and wholly unbalanced, and completely untrimmed.  The machine-sewn, unlined stays are still in the very slow process of being bound.  (I keep breaking the eyes off my leather needles - any ideas?)  The only items I'm truly proud of are the cap, fichu, and petticoat, which use correct materials and techniques.  I'm not stressing about the gown so much, but it looks unfinished and needs much hem fixing and possibly neckline tucks.  And it will never be quite the quality job that I would have liked.


What I'm getting at:  The 1915 dress is going to end up worse than the 1770s outfit.  Worse in that it will take every last second of sewing time, be less-carefully sewn and fitted, the corset will be slapdash and not fit as well as it could, and the hat, shoes, and stockings will be make-dos.  Overall, it will completely stress me out AND it won't be a finished project I'm really proud of.

So why am I doing it?

To be part of the Jampagne group?
 - Most people are doing 1920s.  1915 won't fit with that anyway.

To make a longed-for 1910s outfit, and have the undies to do more Edwardian in the future?
 - With so little time, I won't like what I end up with. It will all need redone anyway.


If I scrap set aside the 1915 stuff for a time, I could do so much more.  The Star is the really important one, for the Gala; and although it's 1860s, and I must do 1860s right, it's my home ground. It'll be awesome.  But I could maybe do an early 30s gown for Jampagne and call it good enough.  Then I could also work on the 18th century outfit and get that right. Maybe even finally get good shoes for it from B&T, instead of spending money on makeshift 1910s ones.  And I could trim the white Regency with color; I've seen a lot of plates that have fun trims on white dresses.  I'll have zero chance of doing any of that if I focus on the 1910s.

But it still seems pretty lame for participation in Jampagne.


What do you think?
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (worry)
Status, shall we?

1. 1940s playsuit

Done! Except for the hem in the skirt, and that I need my mother to mark for me. She hates marking my hems, so that might take a while. ;)

I've also got my eye on some white-frame sunglasses. I like my yellow celluloid ones with blue lenses, but the white ones would be particularly right for this outfit.
And I've got a good straw hat as well. I might replace the much-faded scarf with something else.  Anyone got a scrap of white chiffon or an old scarf they want to get rid of?


2. Star dress

- Overskirt (organza) and underskirt (taffeta) cut out and in the assembly process.
- Bodice cut out and ready to begin assembly.
- Sleeve mockup made and approved, with minor modification. Need to make final pattern.

I need to:
* Finish the sleeve mockup
* Order more organza for sleeves; I have a yard left for for the bertha.
* Order Dresden foil stars. That means I need to decide on the final design. I won't attach them until I get to California, though; either at [livejournal.com profile] fancyfrocks's house or later at the hotel itself.
* Make shoe rosettes and wire headdress.

What do you think of the Star wand? I suspect I might find it annoying to carry around, but if it's important to the "look" I can be a big girl. :p


3. 1915 dress

I'm pretty much nowhere with this, except that the base patterns are enlarged and I have a few corset pieces cut out for the first mockup. I had a setback two weeks ago when I discovered that Needle & Thread had sent me 1.5" webbing instead of 2" webbing. At this point I really don't want to deal with cutting and finishing yards of 2" fabric strips, so I found some 2" cotton twill tape from an ebay seller. That arrived Monday.  I really really need to get this to work quickly.  I'm so nervous!!!

I do have a lot of lawn, and I traced off and added height to the combinations pattern. (3" below the waist and 1" above!) That's the one piece I'm excited about right now. It's a neat design, and looks kind of fun to assemble.

As for the dress itself, I'm pretty much scared about this. I've got a base pattern from PoF that I think will work fairly well, but this is basically the biggest free-handing job I've ever done. I hate uncertainty!  I hate to admit it, but I've been running through other options in case this is total fail or I simply run out of time.

I did decide what to do about stockings. My old "traditional" ballet tights are very pale pink with sewn seams, and I think they would look very good with a white dress. They're definitely opaque, and definitely not silk, but I think the look will be better than obvious modern white tights.  I hate to ruin them by cutting them up for stockings. But they were used for 3 years, they've been in a VERY hot attic for 10 years since, and they're by no means irreplaceable.

The hat... I know I can do this, and it will be fun. But I've got to get everything else done first, and then I'm afraid I'll have to skimp on the hat. :(



Now, for shoes.

Ironically, the Star dress was the easiest. Blue silk boots done right aren't an option for this. And because 1860s is my Accuracy Home, I won't be happy faking something up with modern boots. I know too much!  But I did find white satin ballet slippers that I can approve of. They lack the super-square toe (simply not to be found apart from reproductions), but the material is good and they have full soles of good suede.  They'll also look very cute with blue rosettes. Maybe with a gold star in the middle. :)


I've got options for the 1940s playsuit, too.  I already have from black Corazon sandals from Remix; they're very cute. And a couple of basic pairs of flat leather-strap sandals that will work. But I found a couple espadrilles options on ebay, too:
Olive green flat canvas espadrilles
Bronze sequins beads espadrilles
Opinions, please!

The 1915 dress is the hardest. Early 20th century shoes are characterized by graceful heels, pointed toes, and high vamps.  The heels aren't too hard to find, and pointed toes are possible, but high vamps are vanishingly rare.  And since I've always been picky about shoes being right, this is driving me crazy.
"Court shoes" for ballroom dance are actually very close. But maybe it's the searches I've been running, but I'm finding very little that's not discontinued.
These look about the best for now.
These look pretty good, too.
I really like these, although they're a bit low on the sides; but the price scares me.

And if I'm going to spend that much, I go back to this pair from etsy. In MY SIZE.
Edwardian 'Butterscotch Baby' Leather Louis Heel

If I do more Edwardian (which I'd like to) these might be really good to have. White or pink satin shoes won't be too good with anything but light evening wear or really summery dresses, like the one I'm making now. Financially, I'm able to do the etsy ones; but it's a serious decision, and I really want advice on the way to go.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (worry)
Status, shall we?

1. 1940s playsuit

Done! Except for the hem in the skirt, and that I need my mother to mark for me. She hates marking my hems, so that might take a while. ;)

I've also got my eye on some white-frame sunglasses. I like my yellow celluloid ones with blue lenses, but the white ones would be particularly right for this outfit.
And I've got a good straw hat as well. I might replace the much-faded scarf with something else.  Anyone got a scrap of white chiffon or an old scarf they want to get rid of?


2. Star dress

- Overskirt (organza) and underskirt (taffeta) cut out and in the assembly process.
- Bodice cut out and ready to begin assembly.
- Sleeve mockup made and approved, with minor modification. Need to make final pattern.

I need to:
* Finish the sleeve mockup
* Order more organza for sleeves; I have a yard left for for the bertha.
* Order Dresden foil stars. That means I need to decide on the final design. I won't attach them until I get to California, though; either at [livejournal.com profile] fancyfrocks's house or later at the hotel itself.
* Make shoe rosettes and wire headdress.

What do you think of the Star wand? I suspect I might find it annoying to carry around, but if it's important to the "look" I can be a big girl. :p


3. 1915 dress

I'm pretty much nowhere with this, except that the base patterns are enlarged and I have a few corset pieces cut out for the first mockup. I had a setback two weeks ago when I discovered that Needle & Thread had sent me 1.5" webbing instead of 2" webbing. At this point I really don't want to deal with cutting and finishing yards of 2" fabric strips, so I found some 2" cotton twill tape from an ebay seller. That arrived Monday.  I really really need to get this to work quickly.  I'm so nervous!!!

I do have a lot of lawn, and I traced off and added height to the combinations pattern. (3" below the waist and 1" above!) That's the one piece I'm excited about right now. It's a neat design, and looks kind of fun to assemble.

As for the dress itself, I'm pretty much scared about this. I've got a base pattern from PoF that I think will work fairly well, but this is basically the biggest free-handing job I've ever done. I hate uncertainty!  I hate to admit it, but I've been running through other options in case this is total fail or I simply run out of time.

I did decide what to do about stockings. My old "traditional" ballet tights are very pale pink with sewn seams, and I think they would look very good with a white dress. They're definitely opaque, and definitely not silk, but I think the look will be better than obvious modern white tights.  I hate to ruin them by cutting them up for stockings. But they were used for 3 years, they've been in a VERY hot attic for 10 years since, and they're by no means irreplaceable.

The hat... I know I can do this, and it will be fun. But I've got to get everything else done first, and then I'm afraid I'll have to skimp on the hat. :(



Now, for shoes.

Ironically, the Star dress was the easiest. Blue silk boots done right aren't an option for this. And because 1860s is my Accuracy Home, I won't be happy faking something up with modern boots. I know too much!  But I did find white satin ballet slippers that I can approve of. They lack the super-square toe (simply not to be found apart from reproductions), but the material is good and they have full soles of good suede.  They'll also look very cute with blue rosettes. Maybe with a gold star in the middle. :)


I've got options for the 1940s playsuit, too.  I already have from black Corazon sandals from Remix; they're very cute. And a couple of basic pairs of flat leather-strap sandals that will work. But I found a couple espadrilles options on ebay, too:
Olive green flat canvas espadrilles
Bronze sequins beads espadrilles
Opinions, please!

The 1915 dress is the hardest. Early 20th century shoes are characterized by graceful heels, pointed toes, and high vamps.  The heels aren't too hard to find, and pointed toes are possible, but high vamps are vanishingly rare.  And since I've always been picky about shoes being right, this is driving me crazy.
"Court shoes" for ballroom dance are actually very close. But maybe it's the searches I've been running, but I'm finding very little that's not discontinued.
These look about the best for now.
These look pretty good, too.
I really like these, although they're a bit low on the sides; but the price scares me.

And if I'm going to spend that much, I go back to this pair from etsy. In MY SIZE.
Edwardian 'Butterscotch Baby' Leather Louis Heel

If I do more Edwardian (which I'd like to) these might be really good to have. White or pink satin shoes won't be too good with anything but light evening wear or really summery dresses, like the one I'm making now. Financially, I'm able to do the etsy ones; but it's a serious decision, and I really want advice on the way to go.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1860s)
Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jenthompson, I settled on fancy dress for the Gala.  No surprise that I'm coming home to the 1860s!  I've always loved how those hoops look with short skirts, too, and this is a great opportunity.

On the left, The Star!



I love the colors. White makes me glow, and those medium blues supposedly bring out my eyes. Plus it's almost ridiculously simple in design, except for the sleeves.

The fabrics I have not pinned down yet.  The underskirt and blue look like silk moire.  Nowhere to be found at the moment, at least not in those colors, and while I'm not a starving college student I'm not willing to spend $30/yd yet.  Still, I'd like something with texture to it.  When I posted over at the Sewing Academy, Jessamyn suggested silk/cotton satin from Thai Silks.  She said it's lovely stuff and good to work with.  At $11/yd, I'm willing to try it!  I'm okay with taffeta for the blue, and the overskirt looks like taffeta as well.

So what about the sleeves?  What makes it hard is that they're drawn with drape AND body.  1860s silks were not very drapey; chiffon and gauze, at least in their present limp forms, were not really used.  One person used two layers of silk gauze for similar open "angel" sleeves; that would work, since those open sleeves will flow.  My concern is that this variation has more material, and will collapse under its own weight instead of being cloudlike.  The other sheer silk I can think of, organza, has way too MUCH body and would look like a big poof.  Then there's leno, or gazar maybe, but I just don't know.  What about a silk/cotton voile? Except voile is about the limpest stuff I've ever seen. Silk/linen might work, but 1860s wear pretty much abandoned linen in all forms. Help!

As for the stars, I need a new design. I don't want to cover cardboard with aluminum foil; it looks so obvious! But someone suggested Dresden foil, which I'd never heard of but seems just perfect.  Of course I can't find ALL the different sizes of stars (most are too small) and no diamonds at all.  I like these starbursts in the middle best. At 3.5", they're doable for the biggest decorations.



And these shooting stars are 3 1/2" long as well. There are smaller ones, too.




Any ideas? This particular design area is not my expertise! Also, gold or silver?
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1860s)
Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jenthompson, I settled on fancy dress for the Gala.  No surprise that I'm coming home to the 1860s!  I've always loved how those hoops look with short skirts, too, and this is a great opportunity.

On the left, The Star!



I love the colors. White makes me glow, and those medium blues supposedly bring out my eyes. Plus it's almost ridiculously simple in design, except for the sleeves.

The fabrics I have not pinned down yet.  The underskirt and blue look like silk moire.  Nowhere to be found at the moment, at least not in those colors, and while I'm not a starving college student I'm not willing to spend $30/yd yet.  Still, I'd like something with texture to it.  When I posted over at the Sewing Academy, Jessamyn suggested silk/cotton satin from Thai Silks.  She said it's lovely stuff and good to work with.  At $11/yd, I'm willing to try it!  I'm okay with taffeta for the blue, and the overskirt looks like taffeta as well.

So what about the sleeves?  What makes it hard is that they're drawn with drape AND body.  1860s silks were not very drapey; chiffon and gauze, at least in their present limp forms, were not really used.  One person used two layers of silk gauze for similar open "angel" sleeves; that would work, since those open sleeves will flow.  My concern is that this variation has more material, and will collapse under its own weight instead of being cloudlike.  The other sheer silk I can think of, organza, has way too MUCH body and would look like a big poof.  Then there's leno, or gazar maybe, but I just don't know.  What about a silk/cotton voile? Except voile is about the limpest stuff I've ever seen. Silk/linen might work, but 1860s wear pretty much abandoned linen in all forms. Help!

As for the stars, I need a new design. I don't want to cover cardboard with aluminum foil; it looks so obvious! But someone suggested Dresden foil, which I'd never heard of but seems just perfect.  Of course I can't find ALL the different sizes of stars (most are too small) and no diamonds at all.  I like these starbursts in the middle best. At 3.5", they're doable for the biggest decorations.



And these shooting stars are 3 1/2" long as well. There are smaller ones, too.




Any ideas? This particular design area is not my expertise! Also, gold or silver?

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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