nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
Discovery of the day: A hot iron with steam shrinks and hardens leather.

Dang!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (monster hunter international)
Franks is a government agent, of a sort.

The G-Ride speedometer pegged at a hundred and forty miles an hour but we were going much faster as we entered Montgomery and headed west on the 85.  The black-armored Suburban had been delivered to Franks sometime in the last few days by some of his minions and I was glad of it.  Although MHI had a lot of vehicles, none of them apparently had a... quarter-million-horsepower engine forged in the fires of Mordor like this thing apparently did.  It normally took me forty-five minutes to hit the outskirts of town from Cazador, but Franks had done it in less than twenty, and I wasn't exactly averse to speeding.  The demonic roar of the engine was almost as loud as the banshee siren that warned everyone else to get out of the way or be flattened beneath our armored steel bumpers.  Our tax dollars had equippred Agent Franks with the SUV from Hell.- Monster Hunter Vendetta, by Larry Correia, Ch. 6.

*giggles*



In annoying news, Goodreads has not yet implemented a "reread" option.  I will have to remember, manually add rereads to my total reading count, and manually calculate goal percentages.  Which pretty much negates my major motivation for joining Goodreads in the first place.  To paraphrase Dr. Jones (Sr.), "I wrote it down so I wouldn't have to remember!"

Yes, I haven't done July's roundup. It's pathetic, I'm warning you.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Monster Hunter International)
Franks is a government agent, of a sort.

The G-Ride speedometer pegged at a hundred and forty miles an hour but we were going much faster as we entered Montgomery and headed west on the 85.  The black-armored Suburban had been delivered to Franks sometime in the last few days by some of his minions and I was glad of it.  Although MHI had a lot of vehicles, none of them apparently had a... quarter-million-horsepower engine forged in the fires of Mordor like this thing apparently did.  It normally took me forty-five minutes to hit the outskirts of town from Cazador, but Franks had done it in less than twenty, and I wasn't exactly averse to speeding.  The demonic roar of the engine was almost as loud as the banshee siren that warned everyone else to get out of the way or be flattened beneath our armored steel bumpers.  Our tax dollars had equipped Agent Franks with the SUV from Hell.- Monster Hunter Vendetta, by Larry Correia, Ch. 6.

*giggles*



In annoying news, Goodreads has not implemented a "reread."  I will have to remember, manually add rereads to my total reading count, and manually calculate goal percentages.  Which pretty much negates my major motivation for joining Goodreads in the first place.  To paraphrase Dr. Jones (Sr.), "I wrote it down so I wouldn't have to remember!"

Yes, I haven't done July's roundup. It's pathetic, I'm warning you.
nuranar: (annoyance)

To a certain person on [livejournal.com profile] little_details:

You tend to post pretty good, level-headed answers on a wide variety of mostly historical facts. I find you faintly annoying because you come across as a know-it-all and sometimes contradict others with little courtesy, but your info is almost always pretty good.

But what in the WORLD do the royal marriage customs of 11th century Denmark have to do with King Hiram I of Tyre?  Hiram was a contemporary of David in the 10th century BC.  Two thousand years and a whole continent make for a heck of a lot of cultural variation! Your other examples aren't any better. Burgundia? The Franks? I can't see any cultural parallels with what is now Lebanon.

Maybe you're trying to draw a parallel between the fact that they're non-Christian.  Ancient Near East religion is hardly equal to vestiges of European non-Christianism 1500 years later. I'm honestly wondering if you read the OP's time and setting.

Besides, Hiram is a contemporary neighbor of Solomon, yes, Solomon of the 300-wives-and-700-concubines fame.  How can you argue that Hiram may not have had either wife or concubine, based on indications from Europe 1500 years out of date?

Confusedly,
Me.

nuranar: (annoyance)

To a certain person on [livejournal.com profile] little_details:

You tend to post pretty good, level-headed answers on a wide variety of mostly historical facts. I find you faintly annoying because you come across as a know-it-all and sometimes contradict others with little courtesy, but your info is almost always pretty good.

But what in the WORLD do the royal marriage customs of 11th century Denmark have to do with King Hiram I of Tyre?  Hiram was a contemporary of David in the 10th century BC.  Two thousand years and a whole continent make for a heck of a lot of cultural variation! Your other examples aren't any better. Burgundia? The Franks? I can't see any cultural parallels with what is now Lebanon.

Maybe you're trying to draw a parallel between the fact that they're non-Christian.  Ancient Near East religion is hardly equal to vestiges of European non-Christianism 1500 years later. I'm honestly wondering if you read the OP's time and setting.

Besides, Hiram is a contemporary neighbor of Solomon, yes, Solomon of the 300-wives-and-700-concubines fame.  How can you argue that Hiram may not have had either wife or concubine, based on indications from Europe 1500 years out of date?

Confusedly,
Me.

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (tantrum)
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Oh, yeah, like THAT's not a leading question. SERIOUSLY.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (tantrum)
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Oh, yeah, like THAT's not a leading question. SERIOUSLY.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I'm sitting back and enjoying the current war controversy opinionated discussion over at [livejournal.com profile] little_details .  The original poster's question is, basically, If a guy back on a hypothethical earth roughly equivalent to 10,000 B.C. gets his legs mauled by a Big Nasty Animal, will his wounds get infected, and how likely/survivable is amptuation?

Until comment #10, the consensus of most people - particularly #5 and on - was NO! He's as dead as a doornail!  THOSE STUPID PEOPLE back then did't know squat about infection or surgery or amputation or stopping bleeding or anything!!!! And I know this because I know infection is life-threatening because it happened to ME in the 21st century!!!!1

...because no one who ever got even cut back then ever escaped infection or failed to die of it.  HA.

I do hate statements of this nature.  Especially when cited without actual evidence of any kind. O hai, archeaology? Exists.

Which is what commenter #10 proceeded to point out. Finally.


It's not as if I really even care about the subject at all. But I like truth, which includes getting a true picture of How Things Were, in all its variety and strangeness.  But people extrapolate freely from the specific to the general (Citing one's own hospitalization is evidence of what, please? Your failure to use soap and water?), and more heinously, state even a fairly accurate norm as the no-exceptions rule.  It's like the thing with weather, and temperature averages: An average is made up of a whole lot of below-averages and above-averages.  You can't take an average and then ignore everything outside like it didn't exist.

And you know what? [livejournal.com profile] little_details is about getting help for writing, not about researching for papers. Some of the best stories involve some of the wildest chances out there.  If it could happen, go ahead and write it!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I'm sitting back and enjoying the current war controversy opinionated discussion over at [livejournal.com profile] little_details .  The original poster's question is, basically, If a guy back on a hypothethical earth roughly equivalent to 10,000 B.C. gets his legs mauled by a Big Nasty Animal, will his wounds get infected, and how likely/survivable is amptuation?

Until comment #10, the consensus of most people - particularly #5 and on - was NO! He's as dead as a doornail!  THOSE STUPID PEOPLE back then did't know squat about infection or surgery or amputation or stopping bleeding or anything!!!! And I know this because I know infection is life-threatening because it happened to ME in the 21st century!!!!1

...because no one who ever got even cut back then ever escaped infection or failed to die of it.  HA.

I do hate statements of this nature.  Especially when cited without actual evidence of any kind. O hai, archeaology? Exists.

Which is what commenter #10 proceeded to point out. Finally.


It's not as if I really even care about the subject at all. But I like truth, which includes getting a true picture of How Things Were, in all its variety and strangeness.  But people extrapolate freely from the specific to the general (Citing one's own hospitalization is evidence of what, please? Your failure to use soap and water?), and more heinously, state even a fairly accurate norm as the no-exceptions rule.  It's like the thing with weather, and temperature averages: An average is made up of a whole lot of below-averages and above-averages.  You can't take an average and then ignore everything outside like it didn't exist.

And you know what? [livejournal.com profile] little_details is about getting help for writing, not about researching for papers. Some of the best stories involve some of the wildest chances out there.  If it could happen, go ahead and write it!

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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