nuranar: (reading)
Snagged from [livejournal.com profile] ladyneferankh. :)

1) What author do you own the most books by?
Haha, LibraryThing to the rescue! Although I don't have everything in there yet. Hmph.
Andre Norton, 49.
Edgar Rice Burroughs, 37.
Erle Stanley Gardner, 30-40.
Margery Allingham, 27.
Leslie Charteris, 20-30.
Agatha Christie ought to be up there, too, since between my mother and I we own all but a couple of her 70+ novels. But I did most of my buying in junior high and early high school, and we never kept track of them.

More behind the cut! )
nuranar: (reading)
Snagged from [livejournal.com profile] ladyneferankh. :)

1) What author do you own the most books by?
Haha, LibraryThing to the rescue! Although I don't have everything in there yet. Hmph.
Andre Norton, 49.
Edgar Rice Burroughs, 37.
Erle Stanley Gardner, 30-40.
Margery Allingham, 27.
Leslie Charteris, 20-30.
Agatha Christie ought to be up there, too, since between my mother and I we own all but a couple of her 70+ novels. But I did most of my buying in junior high and early high school, and we never kept track of them.

More behind the cut! )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

When I got home last Wednesday there was a nice fat  package waiting for me.  Not only did it have the three Alistair MacLean books I requested, but the seller had included a fourth for free!  The following note was stickied onto the cover:

Hello:
    Please excuse my wounded condition... You see I got into a fight with a much better swordsman and suffered a gruesome gash across my face.
    I've been bandaged up pretty well and I'm still willing to serve... if you'll have me.
           "The Secret Ways"

*delighted wibble* The injuries in question were two wide razor cuts to the cover, penetrating a couple dozen pages. The cover and first few pages were repaired with tape.  It wasn't PBS-allowable, but just fine for reading, especially with a bookmate.

I requested Night Without End, The Black Shrike, and The Golden Rendezvous, written in MacLean's best years according to Wikipedia, between 1959 and 1962.  The "wounded" book was The Secret Ways, coming immediately before those three.


 

Reviews )



My list of MacLean favorites has jumped from three to six. It was a glorious three days.

 

Writing )

I still have two books yet to read on the early-MacLean list: Fear Is the Key and The Satan Bug, both available on PBS.  How long should I wait before requesting them, d'ya think? :D

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

When I got home last Wednesday there was a nice fat  package waiting for me.  Not only did it have the three Alistair MacLean books I requested, but the seller had included a fourth for free!  The following note was stickied onto the cover:

Hello:
    Please excuse my wounded condition... You see I got into a fight with a much better swordsman and suffered a gruesome gash across my face.
    I've been bandaged up pretty well and I'm still willing to serve... if you'll have me.
           "The Secret Ways"

*delighted wibble* The injuries in question were two wide razor cuts to the cover, penetrating a couple dozen pages. The cover and first few pages were repaired with tape.  It wasn't PBS-allowable, but just fine for reading, especially with a bookmate.

I requested Night Without End, The Black Shrike, and The Golden Rendezvous, written in MacLean's best years according to Wikipedia, between 1959 and 1962.  The "wounded" book was The Secret Ways, coming immediately before those three.


 

Reviews )



My list of MacLean favorites has jumped from three to six. It was a glorious three days.

 

Writing )

I still have two books yet to read on the early-MacLean list: Fear Is the Key and The Satan Bug, both available on PBS.  How long should I wait before requesting them, d'ya think? :D

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I really do seem to fall off the world during these long weekends, don't I?

The Daily Diamond

[phone rings]
Rick:  Diamond Detective Agency.  Mary had a little lamb, she hit it with a stick.  She could've gotten twenty years; instead she came to Rick.

*headdesk*


I listened to a fair amount of Suspense yesterday.  Most were, alas, rather dull or tedious.  What's it with these dames?  Whining, whimpering, or screaming, and they never quit saying useful things like "I'm scared! I'm scared!"   GRRR

But there were a few gems.

Suspense, August 30, 1945, "Nobody Loves Me," with Peter Lorre.  This is the least foreign-sounding I've ever heard him.

Suspense, September 20, 1945, "Library Book," with Myrna Loy.  This is the first radio show besides Lux I've heard her in.  She's just perfect.

Suspense, October 11, 1945, "Beyond Good and Evil," with Joseph Cotten.  I was going to upload thing one for [profile] roses_for_annanyway, but DANG it's good.  Wow.

Suspense, October 25, 1945, "A Shroud for Sara," with Lucille Ball.  I was going to upload this one for [personal profile] sakka, but it's another keeper in its own right.  Lucille Ball's performances in Suspense are going a long, long way to redeeming her "Lucy" image in my mind.  Queen of the B Movies she may have been, but she's a good actress.  Very, very few of the Suspense actresses have been able to really draw me in, but she's done it in all three of her episodes to date.  *two thumbs up*

Suspense, November 1, 1945, "The Dunwich Horror," with Ronald Colman.  This is one of the best OTR Hallowe'en episodes I've ever heard.

Both "A Shroud for Sara" and "The Dunwich Horror" include an uncredited Elliott Lewis.  He's best known for the famous left-handed guitar player Frankie Remley on the Jack Benny and Phil Harris shows.  His voice is very distinctive and he's incredibly versatile.  Besides the madcap Remley, he plays the thoroughly admirable Phil Carney in The Voyage of the Scarlet Queen and did a lot of really good producing/directing.  In the first Suspense episode he grabs the audience's sympathy for a two-time felon who's about to be betrayed; all this is in five minutes, since the story's not too much about him.  In the second, he plays a half-human, half-- Well, remember what I said about versatility?

I'm up to Book Eight in Edgar Rice Burroughs's John Carter of Mars series.  Books 1-3 were terrific.  Books 4-5 were getting a little "eh" - I really prefer male protagonists, thank you, and female ones who are both reckless and not too wise rather irritate me.  Books 6-7 (and 8, so far) are really good.  Burroughs's writing and ability to tell a story just keeps getting better.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I really do seem to fall off the world during these long weekends, don't I?

The Daily Diamond

[phone rings]
Rick:  Diamond Detective Agency.  Mary had a little lamb, she hit it with a stick.  She could've gotten twenty years; instead she came to Rick.

*headdesk*


I listened to a fair amount of Suspense yesterday.  Most were, alas, rather dull or tedious.  What's it with these dames?  Whining, whimpering, or screaming, and they never quit saying useful things like "I'm scared! I'm scared!"   GRRR

But there were a few gems.

Suspense, August 30, 1945, "Nobody Loves Me," with Peter Lorre.  This is the least foreign-sounding I've ever heard him.

Suspense, September 20, 1945, "Library Book," with Myrna Loy.  This is the first radio show besides Lux I've heard her in.  She's just perfect.

Suspense, October 11, 1945, "Beyond Good and Evil," with Joseph Cotten.  I was going to upload thing one for [profile] roses_for_annanyway, but DANG it's good.  Wow.

Suspense, October 25, 1945, "A Shroud for Sara," with Lucille Ball.  I was going to upload this one for [personal profile] sakka, but it's another keeper in its own right.  Lucille Ball's performances in Suspense are going a long, long way to redeeming her "Lucy" image in my mind.  Queen of the B Movies she may have been, but she's a good actress.  Very, very few of the Suspense actresses have been able to really draw me in, but she's done it in all three of her episodes to date.  *two thumbs up*

Suspense, November 1, 1945, "The Dunwich Horror," with Ronald Colman.  This is one of the best OTR Hallowe'en episodes I've ever heard.

Both "A Shroud for Sara" and "The Dunwich Horror" include an uncredited Elliott Lewis.  He's best known for the famous left-handed guitar player Frankie Remley on the Jack Benny and Phil Harris shows.  His voice is very distinctive and he's incredibly versatile.  Besides the madcap Remley, he plays the thoroughly admirable Phil Carney in The Voyage of the Scarlet Queen and did a lot of really good producing/directing.  In the first Suspense episode he grabs the audience's sympathy for a two-time felon who's about to be betrayed; all this is in five minutes, since the story's not too much about him.  In the second, he plays a half-human, half-- Well, remember what I said about versatility?

I'm up to Book Eight in Edgar Rice Burroughs's John Carter of Mars series.  Books 1-3 were terrific.  Books 4-5 were getting a little "eh" - I really prefer male protagonists, thank you, and female ones who are both reckless and not too wise rather irritate me.  Books 6-7 (and 8, so far) are really good.  Burroughs's writing and ability to tell a story just keeps getting better.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The Daily Diamond

[phone rings]
Rick: Diamond Detective Agency, homicide made easy. With us it’s the corpse that counts.



I'm not as sore as I might be, from all the ax-swinging I did yesterday.  I would've done more today regardless, but Bro. No. 1 broke the new handle last night.  Oops.

Keeping with the new trend of personal damage, I did manage to burn myself twice this afternoon while trying to get the fire going.  It took about three hours for it to really catch.  There was practically no wind, and without wind our chimney doesn't draw well at all.

Um... I've read nearly two more John Carter of Mars books.  The current one, The Master Mind of Mars, is quite good.  It starts out with a new protagonist and a very different mad-scientist-sorta storyline that was quite absorbing.  It has the benefit of a very unusual heroine.  Not only does she not irritate me, I thoroughly admire her.

Bro. No. 1 was gone at a coin show most of the day.  (Come to think of it, I wouldn't have gotten much chopping done today anyway; we have a rule, No ax usage when you're home alone.)  When he got back he turned on "In the Navy," with Abbott & Costello and Dick Powell.  I didn't really watch this time, but I heard most of it.  I really do think it's one of their best early films, since it's got the required hilarious high-jinks, but the plot is actually quite good.  Perhaps this is because A&C were still so early in their careers that they were a [large] comic relief element.  The sub-subplot with Lou and Patty Andrews is really quite funny in its own right.

I suspect that Dick found "In the Navy" quite appealing, considering the parts he usually got and the career shift he made in the next few years.  He plays a singing superstar who, disgusted with the cloying atmosphere of adoration, pulls a disappearance and joins the navy under another name.  He's quite determined to leave the old life and image completely behind.  This one was made in 1940 after I-don't-know-how-many years of playing pleasant, bubbly young romantic musical leads; and in 1944 he took off in a completely different direction with Murder, My Sweet.  I am admittedly very partial because of Marlowe and Richard Diamond; but "In the Navy" stands well on its own feet and the background on Dick Powell just fascinates me.  Story-wise, the contrast between "The Singing Marine" and "In the Navy" is almost surreal.  They were made within a few years of each other, and both center around a singer in the military and his changing attitude toward fame.  Each takes such a different direction!

Despite these desperate distractions, I've managed to study some more accounting and I think I'll do decently on the test.  I hope I can get through another practice test tonight.  Tomorrow:  Forget studying, I'm going to finish me a red flannel petticoat!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The Daily Diamond

[phone rings]
Rick: Diamond Detective Agency, homicide made easy. With us it’s the corpse that counts.



I'm not as sore as I might be, from all the ax-swinging I did yesterday.  I would've done more today regardless, but Bro. No. 1 broke the new handle last night.  Oops.

Keeping with the new trend of personal damage, I did manage to burn myself twice this afternoon while trying to get the fire going.  It took about three hours for it to really catch.  There was practically no wind, and without wind our chimney doesn't draw well at all.

Um... I've read nearly two more John Carter of Mars books.  The current one, The Master Mind of Mars, is quite good.  It starts out with a new protagonist and a very different mad-scientist-sorta storyline that was quite absorbing.  It has the benefit of a very unusual heroine.  Not only does she not irritate me, I thoroughly admire her.

Bro. No. 1 was gone at a coin show most of the day.  (Come to think of it, I wouldn't have gotten much chopping done today anyway; we have a rule, No ax usage when you're home alone.)  When he got back he turned on "In the Navy," with Abbott & Costello and Dick Powell.  I didn't really watch this time, but I heard most of it.  I really do think it's one of their best early films, since it's got the required hilarious high-jinks, but the plot is actually quite good.  Perhaps this is because A&C were still so early in their careers that they were a [large] comic relief element.  The sub-subplot with Lou and Patty Andrews is really quite funny in its own right.

I suspect that Dick found "In the Navy" quite appealing, considering the parts he usually got and the career shift he made in the next few years.  He plays a singing superstar who, disgusted with the cloying atmosphere of adoration, pulls a disappearance and joins the navy under another name.  He's quite determined to leave the old life and image completely behind.  This one was made in 1940 after I-don't-know-how-many years of playing pleasant, bubbly young romantic musical leads; and in 1944 he took off in a completely different direction with Murder, My Sweet.  I am admittedly very partial because of Marlowe and Richard Diamond; but "In the Navy" stands well on its own feet and the background on Dick Powell just fascinates me.  Story-wise, the contrast between "The Singing Marine" and "In the Navy" is almost surreal.  They were made within a few years of each other, and both center around a singer in the military and his changing attitude toward fame.  Each takes such a different direction!

Despite these desperate distractions, I've managed to study some more accounting and I think I'll do decently on the test.  I hope I can get through another practice test tonight.  Tomorrow:  Forget studying, I'm going to finish me a red flannel petticoat!

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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