nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
Yesterday I somehow just kept working on the blue cloak. It's now completely assembled, and the ginormous hood I made looks gorgeous. I still need to cut a neck strip out of silk, and then do all the pressing on both silk pieces and cut the arm slits. Then there's just the sewing to put the silk in and the ribbons on. Yay!

Today I got up and opened all the windows in the house, because it started below 70 degrees. No breeze, which is unusual, but it's still been very pleasant. The sewing room has about hit 86, though, which is the a/c setting, so I need to close everything up now. (The sewing room unfortunately has pretty bad circulation. I'd really like to fix that someday... though it will be hard. Still, made it to 1 pm!  This is fall!

So I've gotten the mitts all ready to sew. Fitted the pattern - the size small fits just about perfect - and cut it out of lightweight cream wool flannel. Same stuff as for my stays, actually. And like the stays, it'll be trimmed with light blue: the point lining, and the embroidery. I did all the pressing and stuff so they're ready to take to the reenactment.

I also wrapped one of Bro. No. 2's birthday presents in brown paper. His birthday is Monday, so I'm pretty sure we'll do a few presents and Dutch oven cobbler out at the event.

Then I got started on the divided bum, like Aubry's. I'm doing mine out of a rather coarse-feeling mediumweight white linen. I had more than I expected to have, so it should do well. My pattern is slightly sized up from Aubry's, because she's petite and I'm... not, and my hips are already quite substantial.  For padding I used wool batting from Felted Sky on etsy.  It came super fast! Also, it's not combed into layers like a blanket batt, so it's better for stuffing things.  I LOVE working with wool. Wool batting is soft and elastic and pulls apart like cotton candy; it can compress into a very small space but will always expand to fill the area, so it really doesn't get all matted.  No wonder wool fabric is so awesome!

Anyway, I got the pillows put together, and I'm pleating the under-petticoat now. Except it's time to make lunch. :)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

I stayed up too late last night "researching" a couple of costume things (yeah, via Pinterest), so I slept a little late this morning. But when I got up, I was productive. I put the things that have been soaking in oxi-clean in the wash, got groceries, went to the chiropractor, then had lunch and spent some good time with my parents.  Then I came home and balanced my budget. *wince* I wasn't looking forward to paying the piper after my lovely Costume College & then some vacation! But it really wasn't too bad. And then, for some reason, I was very adult and sent emails and made phone calls, like about insurance, and getting a discount on my internet, and other things. Some of which I've been, uh, needing to do for several years. But it's done, yay!

There's still plenty on my list for the rest of the weekend. But I got rid of the ugliest one, and some bonus things besides. Go me!

Oh! A couple of you might remember at Costume College I had some trouble with my 1790s/1800s stays suddenly making my left shoulder ache horribly. (I know I complained about it to [personal profile] mlsdesigns a lot at the ice cream social!) I went to the chiropractor mainly to have a check after the rear-end accident [personal profile] fancyfrocks and I had two weeks ago (I'm totally fine!), but I did ask about it. Turns out my left shoulder joint was slightly out. When I tightened my stays, particularly the shoulder straps, to wear the red dress, it naturally pulled my shoulders back slightly. And the resulting pressure on a joint that was slightly out, did build up to that straining ache I got after wearing the stays for some time. So it's back in now, and I've got some stretches to do to help it stay in. It's good to know what was going on!

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I'm alive and doing well, in case there was any question. :) I didn't realize how busy I've been until the last couple of days, when it finally stopped.  My singing commitments kind of went crazy. Beginning Thursday the 12th, I had 11 events in 9 days, for 3 different groups:

Thursday: Rehearsal (Impressions)
Friday: Concert (Impressions)
Saturday: Rehearsal (CCBC Cantata, moved a week because of the ice)
Sunday: 3 Concerts (Cantata)
Monday: Rehearsal (Impressions)
Tuesday: Rehearsal (LM Holiday Chorale)
Wednesday: Nothing! Whee!
Thursday: Caroling around the plant (4 hours, 3-4 miles) (Holiday Chorale)
                Rehearsal (Impressions)
Friday: Concert (Impressions)

On top of that, I got into a bad habit of staying up late while I was iced in. I haven't really broken that habit, although I was back to working regularly for two weeks once the roads were clear again. So I've been running on willpower a lot of the time. I really didn't have a breakdown, but Christmas morning I could have fallen asleep in the middle of opening presents. That's my favorite part of Christmas, so it says a lot for how tired I was!

But that's not to say I haven't been enjoying myself. I love singing, and my voice has been just fine. Even after the caroling at work, when my speaking voice was incredibly hoarse, I had one cup of Throat Coat tea and was recovered in time for rehearsal that evening. Pretty amazing, honestly; I don't have the strongest voice ever.

Anyway! Christmas still was lovely. It was Baby Eleanor's first, which was lots of fun. Hours of stimulation and people are exhausting even for a people-person 7-month-old, but she still did really well. After a little while she'd "be sad," as Sarah said, and have to have a break.

The gift-giving was pretty good all-around, too. Two things off my wishlist were a Uniquely You dress form (yep, I've joined the throng!) and navy silk taffeta for my beaded robe de style. Doing the undies and patterning that dress is Number One on the project list.  Oh, and my family named the dress form:  Dolly! My parents and Trevor and Heather and I watched my DVD of the show while they were in town. After this time I can see flaws a lot more, but dang, our Dolly was good.  She turned the dialogue with Horace in the Harmonia Gardens into a riot of one-liners, and "So Long, Dearie" is absolutely hilarious. So I'm glad to name the dress form after her!

And in other giftsquee, I got some lovely packages from [personal profile] jordannamorgan and [personal profile] suededsilk - the last one arriving on Christmas Eve. Perfect timing! The blue rhinestone jewelry is super pretty. I've never seen anything like it. And the little card with me on it - Squee! That totally made my evening. :)  And Jordi, I totally understand the confusion of my wishlist - you chose very  wisely! I was just wishing again a month ago to watch The Ghost Breakers. And I can put the gift card to good use. Thank you! (I mailed you both some packages, but they were the week before Christmas so I have no idea when they'll arrive.)

So after a day of total vegging, I'm working back toward being useful. In other words, I've done one useful thing, instead of none! But I'm rather proud of myself, since I cleaned my bathroom sinks/mirrors and the bathtub, which included unclogging both drains. Ha! I win!

Now, I have to get back to some important TV re-run watching and game playing. ;)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

In the last month I've started and halted on no fewer than 4 garments (3 are shifts); and I've been collecting information on 4 more. And today I started yet another one!

At least I do things. The last two Saturdays have been action-packed: Last week I drove to Fort Richardson (1 hr each way) to spend the daylight with my parents and Bro. No. 1 and SIL and Baby at a Civil War reenactment. Baby is seriously photogenic - she sees a camera and she grins and laughs adorably. I will upload pictures, I promise! She's almost 6 months old. Then I drove back in late afternoon in time for the costume party. All polls I had held were evenly split. I wavered for a long time because I really want to wear the red wool again, but I finally went for Maid Marian because it's the most famous and shiniest. And the party was good. :)

Then yesterday was the WWII Veteran's Day reenactment in Waxahachie.  I was about 98% pleased with my outfit - I think it's the the most accurate look I've ever done. Navy blue suit (no later than the mid-1940s), me-made white blouse, felt flower corsage from suededsilk, medium-sized red screw-back earrings, 1940s navy calf shoes, blue straw tilt hat with red and gray ribbon band, navy crocheted/beaded round drawstring bag with hard bottom, and the best 1940s hairstyle I've ever achieved. I felt like a million. Dad took lots of pictures. :)

I eventually got there after noon. I had a super satisfying lamb gyro for lunch, then wandered the antique shops and repro fabric quilt shop. All I bought was a $3 omnibus of three Mr. Campion books, all of which I already have; but it was printed in the late '30s and will be great for reading at other reenactments. I was happy. :)  Then I met up with my parents and we watched the battle. I've seen quite a few, so during it I got some knitting done on a baby blanket. The wool kept knotting so Mumsie rolled the skein into a ball.  We killed some time hunting down an abandoned rail line just south of town, then had dinner, and Dad and I drove to the Music Hall in Fair Park. We saw The Lord of the Rings in Concert. It was so good! The entire score was played by the Dallas Pops orchestra, and the vocal parts were sung by the Pops chorus, a children's choir, and two soloists. The lady soloist appeared to be in Elf dress, complete with Arwen braids.  I was still in 40s, but I didn't wear the hat. ;)

Today has been a tired day, but church and choir was good this morning. This afternoon I took care of a couple emails, then started yet another costume piece: headwear for the Georgian picnic next Saturday. I'm wearing the 1790s curtain-along dress (the red print wrap front), which I first wore at Costume College. I tried a wig then, going for the modified later "hedgehog," but I'm not sure it worked. I am sure, however, that it wasn't a flattering style for my face. So I'll do something with my own hair (I suspect involving sponge rollers and possibly a fall), but I wanted something to cover up.

After spending an hour on Pinterest, mostly finding various hats which looked a bit challenging (since I lack the Millinery Gene, like whoa), I pulled out the Country Wives "Beribboned Caps" pattern.  I really liked the look of View E (lower right), which has Ribbon Bows of Awesomeness in addition to a sheer inner ruffle; but the crown/caul piece wasn't that big, so I'm using the View C crown with it (lower left). I'm also doing slightly different construction (hemming all pieces and using whipped gathers) and modifying for a back drawstring (which they leave out.) And I just saw that Merja made View E to go with her 1790 mourning gown! Yep, I definitely love the ruffles.  I'm using a fine cotton lawn for most of the cap, including the outer ruffle (starching it), and silk organza for the inner one. And I have exactly enough dark pine-green satin ribbon to make two huge ribbon rosettes with a band around the cap. Hehehe.

Now, I just need to find time to hand-sew all of this. Yikes...
nuranar: (noir)
*yawn* So sleepy! I got home last night and found that while the fan was going and air was coming out of the vents, it wasn't cool air. The downstairs was still at right what it should be (it was only 84 F yesterday), but the sewing room upstairs was 94.  So I called someone I know, got a recommendation for someone else fairly close to me, and set it up for him to come later in the evening. I opened some windows, cracked open the garage door, and turned on the ceiling fans, while I ate downstairs and got back to work on the sheer dress.  The main part of the house warmed up about 2 degrees, but the upstairs fell to 86 by the time the repair man arrived after 9.  He was a great guy; retired from my company just over 10 years ago, and super nice. I followed him around and held the flashlight, both inside and out. Eventually he replaced a wire outside and that did it! It was still almost 11 by the time we were done.  So it was a late night, and needless to say I did not wash and set my hair. ;)


In other news, I will be an aunt very shortly. :) My sister-in-law Sarah was due on Sunday, however... no Baby Bruno or Brunette* yet!

* Facetious name by Bro. No. 2 and Heather. Not sure how Bro. No. 1 and Sarah feel about that!


In Hello Dolly news, Monday night's rehearsal went really well.  We've worked on 4 songs, in 2 or 3 rehearsals, and they're sounding very good. Beginning to memorize, and definitely working on facial animation and expression. One of the assistant directors (white-haired professor lady - a sort of director emeritus - I'll call her D.E.) singled out two people who were doing it right - and I was the first one she pointed two. That makes me happy! It's all due to my mom. Early in my dancing "career", probably when I was about 10, she showed me how to make sure my hands were under control and, more importantly, that I was smiling big. I learned that lesson well, so when I got into choir as a senior, it was second nature to put on that smile and project "I'm having FUN!" in front of an audience.  It's both easier and harder to do it when singing than dancing, but I'm glad I'm doing it right!

On another note, me and the other highest-voice lady were successfully able to sustain the D flat note at the end of one of the songs. And then the musical director decided they weren't needed!  In the past that would have bothered me, because I love high notes and this particular director is notorious for arbitrarily leaving them off or minimizing them. But Dolly has plenty of other high notes just in these four songs, so I'm happy. And I know now that I CAN hit and hold a D flat in concert, which is most of the battle.


I don't think I mentioned that I'm getting my first crown on Friday. I've got fairly healthy teeth - yellow, but strong and healthy - but this is a big cavity in my first adult molar. I got it when I was little, and I think before my family had dental insurance. It has already been replaced once (with silver, so that was a long time ago as well), and now other parts of the tooth have started to chip away around it. So it's time. The plan is to head to Dallas after that and try to find fur for the court dress. That might be interesting. :p




nuranar: (vintage style)
The red wool gown is finished! (Except for the loops, which I forgot about.) And also,

The red wool reticule is finished! And it's really cute. Not entirely what I'd envisioned, but not in a bad way. It's so awesome to get it done, though.

Still to go: The wings! I'm trying not to stress over them. Not only is there SO much to do yet (as in everything, including cutting out the paisley feathers), but I'm going to have to make it up as I go along. Whew.

Anyway, I'm still looking forward to the vintage show tomorrow, and then a baby shower for my sister in law. :) Good day!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I missed a day! But I guess a day (mostly) full of happy things is a decent excuse for not posting.

Christmas Day

1. A quiet early morning. Traditional breakfast with sausage and English muffins, and then just sitting in the dim living room with all the Christmas lights on inside and outside.

2. Christmas at my grandmother's house with all the cousins (except Bro. No. 2) and two fiancees for bonus.

3. SNOW!!! The day started with rain, and shortly after lunch it turned to snow. It snowed heavily for most of the afternoon, including while we were opening presents. And then we went out in it for a little bit. It was amazing!

4. Starting a 1000-piece puzzle with my mother. It's a painting of lots of British warships at anchor. And it glows in the dark. :p  We watched Christmas episodes of old TV shows until our reception got lousy, and then switched to Dick Van Dyke.


Wednesday

1. Sleeping in a little bit.

2. Finishing my last Christmas present. WHEW!

3. Relaxing afternoon working the puzzle until Bro. No. 2 and Heather arrived from Houston. Yay!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Regency winter)
Merry Christmas, everyone!  Yesterday's happy things:

1. Yet more work on a Christmas present. The finished product... has its points. More to come. ;)

2. Wrapping all the presents. Hurrah for the big work table!  And for red and white ribbon that curls so prettily. (The less said about the green ribbon the better. !!!)

3. Yet more Dick Van Dyke. WALNUTS!

4. Christmas Eve at the parents' house, with Bro. No. 1 and wife. Steak for dinner, and Mexican Train afterward.


Not really "happy things" yet, but so far this morning I have:

(1) Woken up to a thunderstorm.

(2) Got out of bed 20 minutes later when informing there was HAIL.

(3) First thought was [SQUIRREL!] ahem, Camera! and then MY CAR!

(4) Took several pictures. The hail was tiny, about dried-pea size (and hence no threat to the car), but there was a nice amount. It made nice pictures with the Christmas yard lights.

(5) With my mother, shot at a squirrel in the pecan tree, trying to steal pecans. As my mother said, THEY don't know it's Christmas, the little thieves. (If you're new to my journal, we use Airsoft on squirrels.)  It's been a big pecan year. My mother has felt like she's been living the Dick Van Dyke "Walnuts" episode, except with pecans. Pecans on the kitchen table, under the piano, on the living room floor, in the spare bedroom...

(6) Interrupted myself while typing this post to shoot at TWO squirrels getting back in the tree. (Can you tell where the interruption was?) It's still raining steadily. I think I need to reload...
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
1. Finishing the retaining wall! A family friend came over with his truck and his trailer. He picked up a cubic yard and a half of dirt to finish filling in the area behind the wall/in the flower beds, and he also got the rocks we had unearthed to help build up his driveway. With my parents, my cousin Abe, our friend, and his grown daughter and teen son, we got it all done before noon. Including two trips to Mansfield. He was only able to get 1 yard of dirt on the first trip, and only about 2/3 of the rocks.

2. Completing my Christmas shopping. You know, the most frustrating part was trying to get out of parking lots. The roads themselves aren't bad, parking is available if you don't mind walking (I don't), the stores are busy but not bad, and the checkout lines aren't that long. But getting back into the street is murder!

3. Making lots of good progress on the gifts I'm making. They should be done in time for Christmas Day, which they don't even need to be - our family Christmas isn't until the 27th. :p
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Regency winter)
1. Singing a fun piece from the cantata for the special music during the service. I'm firmly in the camp that [almost] any song can be improved by being sped up, so I tend to approve of quick-tempo songs. This was definitely one such.

2. Lunch (at Whataburger!) with the parents, Bro. No. 1 & [livejournal.com profile] ladylilac12, and another friend from church.

3. Talking to Bro. No. 2 on the phone. It was a good conversation. I'm so excited for when he and H. arrive in town on the 26th!

4. Finishing one part of H's presents. I'm not sure yet if this is for her birthday (the 23rd) or for Christmas.

5. Discovering that I think I really LIKE embroidery.  I had a blast doing the embroidery on Taylor's mitts, and then I just did my initials on something else. My initials! In backstitch! That's all! But it was SO FUN.  Like, actively fun.  Moreso than knitting or crochet, or even regular handstitching. I moderately enjoy non-fiddly handsewing, but it doesn't give me the "This is fun!" rush I've gotten from the embroidery.  As a result, the 18th Century Embroidery Techniques book is on my wishlist. :)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (firelight)
I was SURE I posted yesterday morning! I guess not. Oops.

Wednesday, 06 December

1. Good day at work. I got a lot done, and relatively few weird pop-up issues.
2. Another nice, relaxing evening at home.  I finished running the gathering stitches on Heather's petticoat, so all that was left was the waistband.  Because I'm rather fanatical about efficient fabric usage, that meant the petticoat sat while I cut out two chemises from my Pimatex.  Of course the waistband came out of the scraps of that. :p
3. Chicken fried rice, with extra eggs, out of a box. :D


Thursday, 07 December

1. Choir night! Impressions, this time. That's almost always a happy thing. And after last Friday's big surprise, it was just that much happier. Mr. A said that he hopes all of us have someone do something as nice for us someday. :D
2.  Helping my mother set up Christmas decorations, last-minute before voice lessons/rehearsal.  (We meet in my parents' living room.)  She was rather frantic, trying to set up the miniature village on top of the piano and vacuuming the carpet.
3.  After choir, having Mumsie ask my opinion on what all she's planning to do with the master bathroom. They're gutting the shower and entirely re-doing it, but keeping the top half of the current wallpaper. Deciding the right tile is tricky, and then she came up with the cutest decoration for the walls, and a way to tie it into the deep tub surround.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (cool)
Life has been particularly atypical for the last two months, thanks to a temporary re-assignment at work. I'm now back to my usual duties, which is both sad and a relief. Enough of  that.

I have done a lot of sewing in the last couple months as well. Pretty much every chance I got, that wasn't at work or otherwise committed. First in June I had to finish up my bridesmaid dress for Bro. No. 2's wedding and my dress for the rehearsal dinner. The wedding was lovely (Saturday June 23rd), and both dresses were finished on time. The buttons made it onto the RH dress in the car on the way down the day of the rehearsal, and I put the hem in the bridesmaid dress right before getting dressed the day of the wedding. No worries! :p

I have no shame about sewing up to the last minute, provided that it actually does get Done In Time. That did NOT happen at Costume College last year. It didn't bother me too much at the time, but looking back I really regret the time spent staying up late and holed up in my hotel room sewing and being stressed instead of enjoying time with friends and hanging out.

So I made a determination this year to not be sewing at Costume College. Maybe a little beforehand, on the plane and with [livejournal.com profile] fancyfrocks, but not otherwise.

The problems are (1) inspiration doesn't strike easily for me, and (2) I have little experience in deadline-geared sewing, especially in a working/no school situation.  Making the two dresses for the wedding ended up eating WAY more of my time than I expected. In particular the RH dress, which was FABULOUS and you will definitely see it here later.  But it dominated June, so apart from diddling with the 1780s something-or-other I'm working on, and thinking through and sourcing stuff for the Semi-Secret Gala Gown, that was all I did.


Enough of wimpy woes, though! My life is good, and I am very blessed by God.

A way I keep motivated is by accomplishment.  I have literally made a list, beginning with things I have already done, just so I can start by crossing things off. I get an adrenaline rush from crossing things off!  That's one reason I hate making muslins and patterns, because there's nothing to complete.  I've done a lot of that recently, for both the 1780s pink wool and the Gala.

The timing of the Independence Day holiday and the end of my job reassignment worked out really well.  I got nearly 12 hours of steady work in on the Gala dress Friday, from finishing a last component muslin, to cutting out EVERYTHING, to completing construction on the bodice. (Down to the fastening! I'm SO proud of myself.) I could have put the rest of it together then, too, except I wanted things to hang a bit.

Saturday and Sunday I didn't have nearly as much time and Sunday I wasn't feeling so well, but I chipped away some more, finally bought some desperately-needed materials for accessories, and finished two simple components.  (See, finishing? Yay for accomplishment!)  I've also realized I need to go back to Dallas to get some more fabric, but both should still be there and it won't be expensive. I had the perfect amount of main gown fabric, [livejournal.com profile] jenthompson!

I still have a lot to do, though.  Time for a list!
nuranar: (sewing)
Star dress pictures!

The fabrics. White silk taffeta, and blue silk taffeta - white or silver one way, teal the other way. I think it's what [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat used for her Marie Antoinette dress, and it's gorgeous. I only got 2 yards, and I'm afraid to look to see if they have more. I absolutely don't need a stash of silk taffeta (Expense! Money! Ahhh!) but man.



Read more... )
nuranar: (sewing)
Star dress pictures!

The fabrics. White silk taffeta, and blue silk taffeta - white or silver one way, teal the other way. I think it's what [livejournal.com profile] koshka_the_cat used for her Marie Antoinette dress, and it's gorgeous. I only got 2 yards, and I'm afraid to look to see if they have more. I absolutely don't need a stash of silk taffeta (Expense! Money! Ahhh!) but man.



Read more... )
nuranar: (vintage style)
I seem to have fallen completely off the LJ bandwagon this Christmas, mostly due to a lovely time with family, friends, books, puzzles, sewing, knitting, and football.  Lots of lots of football. Including my very first bowl game in person!

More of that later, however.  I suspect I've got several hundred friends' page entries to catch up on!  In the meantime, though, I'm seeking recommendations for things to watch online.  I'm thinking mostly YouTube, like that one [livejournal.com profile] suededsilk found of The Secret of the Incas, which I still haven't watched and is on my list.  Any other recommendations?
nuranar: (vintage style)
I seem to have fallen completely off the LJ bandwagon this Christmas, mostly due to a lovely time with family, friends, books, puzzles, sewing, knitting, and football.  Lots of lots of football. Including my very first bowl game in person!

More of that later, however.  I suspect I've got several hundred friends' page entries to catch up on!  In the meantime, though, I'm seeking recommendations for things to watch online.  I'm thinking mostly YouTube, like that one [livejournal.com profile] suededsilk found of The Secret of the Incas, which I still haven't watched and is on my list.  Any other recommendations?
nuranar: (reading)
This one from [livejournal.com profile] seawasp


1) What author do you own the most books by? Not sure. With the weekend's acquisitions, I have 32 Saint books, so that's probably the highest.  The Agatha Christie and Nancy Drew collections surpass that, but both are jointly owned by my mother and I. And the majority of the Louis L'Amours are Nathan's.

2) What book do you own the most copies of? With far too little space for the books, I don't like having multiple copies of many things unless there's a reason for a particular edition. I have duplicates of some Austens and Sherlock Holmes, but I think the winner is Bibles, with five. In length-of-ownership order, I have the Living Bible I was given for Christmas in... 1989, I think; the NIV I got for Xmas in 1992 or 1993; a slimmer NIV, this time from the church, upon my high school graduation in 2001; an 1855 pocket-sized KJV I bought on ebay while in college to use for 1860s reenacting, and which I often carry to church because it's the smallest; and the NIV study Bible given to me by Mr. and Mrs. Klob when I graduated from college in 2005.

3) Did it bother you that both those questions ended with prepositions? Nope. Sometimes I try to avoid it in my writing, but only when it doesn't sound too contrived.

4) What fictional character are you secretly in love with? Oh, I love Richard Diamond, but that's hardly a secret; and he is a radio character, not a book character. There's plenty of others I could love, but none come to mind right now when I want them.

5) What book have you read the most times in your life? Err.  I never keep count. The Bible, Ben-Hur, Alistair MacLean's Where Eagles Dare and The Golden Rendezvous, Rifles for Watie, maybe Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime and The Man in the Brown Suit; probably lots more. I love to re-read.

6) What was your favourite book when you were ten years old? Nothing stands out; probably a Nancy Drew. I read all of Mom's before I was 8, and I added to the collection for years.  I also loved The Black Stallion; it's one of the earliest books I remember reading, certainly before first grade.  I would have read it to death except that I never owned it.

7) What is the worst book you’ve read in the past year? Not sure. Probably the book I stumbled across on Project Gutenberg that ends unhappily, with the central character going rather nuts - after the reader's been suckered into really really rooting for him and the woman. I loathe books wherein the main character(s) really, truly are insane.

8) What is the best book you’ve read in the past year? Impossible to say. Thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, it's a choice among hundreds.

9) If you could force everyone you know to read one book, what would it be? I can't think of one. People tend to hate what they are forced to do. I sure do!

10) Who deserves to win the next Nobel Prize for Literature? Not a clue.

11) What book would you most like to see made into a movie? There was something I was thinking about recently, but I'm dashed if I can think of it now... I would love to see the Lensman books made into good movies, but there's No Way In The Universe that's going to be done acceptably.

12) What book would you least like to see made into a movie? There's an ocean of drivel that should never be given the shred of dignity conferred by movie release. And then there's the Lensman books, as I just mentioned; honestly, I would cringe if I heard they were being filmed, because they wouldn't be right.

13) Describe your weirdest dream involving a writer, book, or literary character. I don't remember my dreams. This phenomenon has long been a cause for passing puzzlement and frustration.

14) What is the most lowbrow book you’ve read as an adult? I have no pretense to any brow. This question and all its implications annoys me.

15) What is the most difficult book you’ve ever read? Maybe the textbook for discrete mathematics, although I don't remember a thing about it. It's more likely the first programming text I had, since it hopelessly confounded me for the first fourteen minutes and put me to sleep within the fifteenth.

16) What is the most obscure Shakespeare play you’ve seen? Neither The Tempest nor King Lear is obscure, methinks.

17) Do you prefer the French or the Russians? As authors, neither. Judging from what I've read, French, for the sake of Victor Hugo and Jules Verne.

18) Roth or Updike?  Who?

19) David Sedaris or Dave Eggers? Who?

20) Shakespeare, Milton, or Chaucer? Shakespeare. I haven't read enough Milton to know for sure, though.

21) Austen or Eliot? Austen.

22) What is the biggest or most embarrassing gap in your reading? The biggest gap would probably be the so-called "Lost Generation" writers, both American and British. I have little-to-zero interest in the worldview of those writers or the content of their writings, and no plans to ever close that "gap" in my reading.  I'm not embarrassed about this gap.  I do wish I had read more 19th-century literature back when I had more time and less tired brain cells, but it's still a strength in my reading and I'm planning to continue.

23) What is your favourite novel? Another impossible question. I'd probably have a list of 50, even if I limited favorite authors to one book. The ones I've read multiple times are there.

24) Play? The translation of Molière's Tartuffe, or The Hypocrite in my high school lit book is hilarious and made of awesome. (So is Wishbone's version of The Hypochondriac!)  I want to find out which translator did it and get Tartuffe, and others if possible, by him.

25) Poem? Not sure. Maybe If.

26) Essay? Either "On Faerie Stories" or one of C. S. Lewis's writing ones, such as "On Writing for Children" or "On Science Fiction."

27) Short story? I have no idea. There are way too many to tell, especially considering the SF ones.

28) Work of non-fiction?  The Bible. Aside from that, Costume in Detail. I've pored over the drawings in that book for years, and it still never fails to fascinate me.

29) Who is your favourite writer? I can't pick one. Alastair MacLean is waay up there.

30) Who is the most overrated writer alive today? No idea. I read little that was published in the last 10, 20, or 30 years.  I'd take a stab at Stephanie Meyer, but for all the raving I haven't heard anyone actually building up her writing.  (I don't seek out such discussion, though.)

31) What is your desert island book? Swiss Family Robinson.

32) And… what are you reading right now? LJ, with forays to Wikipedia (drama on the Lost Generation talk page, ahoy!), Amazon, and my tags list, to garner links.
nuranar: (reading)
This one from [livejournal.com profile] seawasp


1) What author do you own the most books by? Not sure. With the weekend's acquisitions, I have 32 Saint books, so that's probably the highest.  The Agatha Christie and Nancy Drew collections surpass that, but both are jointly owned by my mother and I. And the majority of the Louis L'Amours are Nathan's.

2) What book do you own the most copies of? With far too little space for the books, I don't like having multiple copies of many things unless there's a reason for a particular edition. I have duplicates of some Austens and Sherlock Holmes, but I think the winner is Bibles, with five. In length-of-ownership order, I have the Living Bible I was given for Christmas in... 1989, I think; the NIV I got for Xmas in 1992 or 1993; a slimmer NIV, this time from the church, upon my high school graduation in 2001; an 1855 pocket-sized KJV I bought on ebay while in college to use for 1860s reenacting, and which I often carry to church because it's the smallest; and the NIV study Bible given to me by Mr. and Mrs. Klob when I graduated from college in 2005.

3) Did it bother you that both those questions ended with prepositions? Nope. Sometimes I try to avoid it in my writing, but only when it doesn't sound too contrived.

4) What fictional character are you secretly in love with? Oh, I love Richard Diamond, but that's hardly a secret; and he is a radio character, not a book character. There's plenty of others I could love, but none come to mind right now when I want them.

5) What book have you read the most times in your life? Err.  I never keep count. The Bible, Ben-Hur, Alistair MacLean's Where Eagles Dare and The Golden Rendezvous, Rifles for Watie, maybe Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime and The Man in the Brown Suit; probably lots more. I love to re-read.

6) What was your favourite book when you were ten years old? Nothing stands out; probably a Nancy Drew. I read all of Mom's before I was 8, and I added to the collection for years.  I also loved The Black Stallion; it's one of the earliest books I remember reading, certainly before first grade.  I would have read it to death except that I never owned it.

7) What is the worst book you’ve read in the past year? Not sure. Probably the book I stumbled across on Project Gutenberg that ends unhappily, with the central character going rather nuts - after the reader's been suckered into really really rooting for him and the woman. I loathe books wherein the main character(s) really, truly are insane.

8) What is the best book you’ve read in the past year? Impossible to say. Thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, it's a choice among hundreds.

9) If you could force everyone you know to read one book, what would it be? I can't think of one. People tend to hate what they are forced to do. I sure do!

10) Who deserves to win the next Nobel Prize for Literature? Not a clue.

11) What book would you most like to see made into a movie? There was something I was thinking about recently, but I'm dashed if I can think of it now... I would love to see the Lensman books made into good movies, but there's No Way In The Universe that's going to be done acceptably.

12) What book would you least like to see made into a movie? There's an ocean of drivel that should never be given the shred of dignity conferred by movie release. And then there's the Lensman books, as I just mentioned; honestly, I would cringe if I heard they were being filmed, because they wouldn't be right.

13) Describe your weirdest dream involving a writer, book, or literary character. I don't remember my dreams. This phenomenon has long been a cause for passing puzzlement and frustration.

14) What is the most lowbrow book you’ve read as an adult? I have no pretense to any brow. This question and all its implications annoys me.

15) What is the most difficult book you’ve ever read? Maybe the textbook for discrete mathematics, although I don't remember a thing about it. It's more likely the first programming text I had, since it hopelessly confounded me for the first fourteen minutes and put me to sleep within the fifteenth.

16) What is the most obscure Shakespeare play you’ve seen? Neither The Tempest nor King Lear is obscure, methinks.

17) Do you prefer the French or the Russians? As authors, neither. Judging from what I've read, French, for the sake of Victor Hugo and Jules Verne.

18) Roth or Updike?  Who?

19) David Sedaris or Dave Eggers? Who?

20) Shakespeare, Milton, or Chaucer? Shakespeare. I haven't read enough Milton to know for sure, though.

21) Austen or Eliot? Austen.

22) What is the biggest or most embarrassing gap in your reading? The biggest gap would probably be the so-called "Lost Generation" writers, both American and British. I have little-to-zero interest in the worldview of those writers or the content of their writings, and no plans to ever close that "gap" in my reading.  I'm not embarrassed about this gap.  I do wish I had read more 19th-century literature back when I had more time and less tired brain cells, but it's still a strength in my reading and I'm planning to continue.

23) What is your favourite novel? Another impossible question. I'd probably have a list of 50, even if I limited favorite authors to one book. The ones I've read multiple times are there.

24) Play? The translation of Molière's Tartuffe, or The Hypocrite in my high school lit book is hilarious and made of awesome. (So is Wishbone's version of The Hypochondriac!)  I want to find out which translator did it and get Tartuffe, and others if possible, by him.

25) Poem? Not sure. Maybe If.

26) Essay? Either "On Faerie Stories" or one of C. S. Lewis's writing ones, such as "On Writing for Children" or "On Science Fiction."

27) Short story? I have no idea. There are way too many to tell, especially considering the SF ones.

28) Work of non-fiction?  The Bible. Aside from that, Costume in Detail. I've pored over the drawings in that book for years, and it still never fails to fascinate me.

29) Who is your favourite writer? I can't pick one. Alastair MacLean is waay up there.

30) Who is the most overrated writer alive today? No idea. I read little that was published in the last 10, 20, or 30 years.  I'd take a stab at Stephanie Meyer, but for all the raving I haven't heard anyone actually building up her writing.  (I don't seek out such discussion, though.)

31) What is your desert island book? Swiss Family Robinson.

32) And… what are you reading right now? LJ, with forays to Wikipedia (drama on the Lost Generation talk page, ahoy!), Amazon, and my tags list, to garner links.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
And it's 37 degrees, the flakes are big, nothing is sticking, everything is soaking wet, and there's practically no wind, unlike last Thursday's tornado.

It's still pretty.

The attic is more or less clean, I've more or less cleaned the heaps of mail off my desk, the boys are playing computer games, and Dad and Mom should be getting back from Home 'n' Depot with a rented enormous ladder to put a ceiling fan in our 14' high dining room.  And I'm sitting down to sew chemises and watch Pride and Prejudice yet again, but with Trevor this time. :)

Oh, and I bought that muff, after seeing Lady Catherine's enormous ermine-and-tassels affair.  This is mink, I think, with no tassels but nice sateen lining and finishing and a name label sewn inside, written with nice Spencerian handwriting.  Pictures forthcoming.  Someday I shall have need of a Regency winter outfit.  Right? Of course right!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
And it's 37 degrees, the flakes are big, nothing is sticking, everything is soaking wet, and there's practically no wind, unlike last Thursday's tornado.

It's still pretty.

The attic is more or less clean, I've more or less cleaned the heaps of mail off my desk, the boys are playing computer games, and Dad and Mom should be getting back from Home 'n' Depot with a rented enormous ladder to put a ceiling fan in our 14' high dining room.  And I'm sitting down to sew chemises and watch Pride and Prejudice yet again, but with Trevor this time. :)

Oh, and I bought that muff, after seeing Lady Catherine's enormous ermine-and-tassels affair.  This is mink, I think, with no tassels but nice sateen lining and finishing and a name label sewn inside, written with nice Spencerian handwriting.  Pictures forthcoming.  Someday I shall have need of a Regency winter outfit.  Right? Of course right!

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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