nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
Tuppy:   Guess what! I'm going to the opera tonight.
Bertie:   Opera, Tuppy?
Tuppy:   Cora's singing in the, um, Barber of Figaro.
Bertie:   Is that the one about the pyramids?
Barmy:   Sounds like it is, from the name.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (funny)
(it's like shooting fish in a barrel, I know)

"... gown by Parisian courtier Worth..."

Whee!

8 February 2017 10:32 pm
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (funny)
I was looking something up about the Carol Burnett Show. Somehow I ended up on youtube and saw a comment about the best TV sketches, putting the elephant story up there with Nile Crane ironing his pants, and Betty White's herring circus.

I have seen Niles iron his pants (and howled during the whole thing), but I hadn't heard of the herring circus before.  If you're curious...



I really enjoy watching the masters go off script, and how their victims handle it. Of course the Carol Burnett Show is one of the very best examples of this, particularly when Tim Conway was in a sketch. And you get to learn how the actors typically move, and detect when they're reacting out of character. Like noticing the way Carol will cover her mouth. The Golden Girls sketch is like that, too. Dorothy and Blanche were definitely not prepared! I wonder how it was originally scripted?
nuranar: (noir)
I nearly choked on my tea just now. I was finishing the cup when I heard a James Cagney impression in the middle of a work conversation a few cubicles down.

"You dirty rat!"

:D

* Obv. it's all about the intonation and delivery, not the words, when it comes to that particular time-worn impression. ;)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I don't know how they're playing! The falling snow alone is so heavy it's hard to see anything, much less a football in the air. (They're still making completions!) But even funnier, it's only the end of the first quarter and snow is several inches deep on the field. There was a fumble and the ball almost got lost and buried. And when anyone falls or is tackled face-down, his helmet face mask gets literally FULL of snow! They can't remove their helmets on the field, so some of them shake it out, but at least one had to go to the sidelines to clear it out. Insane and hilarious!
nuranar: (books)

I have the Baylor/Kentucky basketball game on. Kentucky's leading scorer of the game (who incidentally just fouled out, with under two minutes to go), is named...

Archie Goodwin.

:D

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (chill)
Place a block of refrigerated cream cheese in foil wrapper and a stick of refrigerated butter in waxed paper on the back patio at 5:30 PM.  Wait 25 minutes.

The good: Block of cream cheese is nicely softened and ready to use as a spread.

The bad: Stick of butter is half liquid and half all but, good only for dipping.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (oops)
I've posted it before, too, but it was *checks* FOUR years ago. So enjoy anyway!

This is an excerpt from a spy story by Alistair MacLean (When Eight Bells Toll). It's the middle of the night, and the protagonist is on a short grass landing strip, near the enemy base (a private castle on a Scottish island).

The strip was smooth and flat and I made good time without having to use the big rubber torch I had with me. I didn't dare use it anyway, not so close to the castle. There was no light to be seen from there but that was no guarantee that the ungodly weren't maintaining a sleepless watch on the battlements. If I were the ungodly, I'd have been maintaining a sleepless watch on the battlements. I stumbled over something warm and soft and alive and hit the ground hard.

My nerves weren't what they had been forty-eight hours ago and my reactions were comparatively fast. I had the knife in my hand and was on him before he could get to his feet. To his four feet. He had about him the pungent aroma of a refugee from Tim Hutchinson's flensing shed. Well might they say why stinks the goat on yonder hill who seems to dote on chlorophyll. I said a few conciliatory words to our four-footed friend and it seemed to work for he kept his horns to himself. I went on my way.

This humiliating sort of encounter, I'd noticed, never happened to the Errol Flynns of this world. Moreover, if Errol Flynn had been carrying a torch a little fall like that would not have smashed it. Had he been carrying only a candle it would still have kept burning brightly in the darkness. But not my torch. Not my rubber encased, rubber mounted bulb, plexiglass guaranteed unbreakable torch. It was kaput. I fished out the little pencil torch and tried it inside my jacket. I could have spared myself the caution, a glowworm would have sneered at it. I stuck it back in my pocket and kept going.

I didn't know how far I was from the precipitous end of the cliff and I'd no intention of finding out the hard way. I dropped to my hands and knees and crawled forward, the glowworm leading the way. I reached the cliff edge in five minutes and found what I was looking for almost at once...

I heard a slight noise behind me. A moderately fit five-year-old grabbing me by the ankles could have had me over the edge with nothing I could do to prevent it. Or maybe it was Billy the Kid back to wreak vengeance for the rude interruption of his night's sleep. I swung around with torch and gun at the ready. It was Billy the Kid, his yellow eyes staring balefully out of the night. But his eyes belied him, he was just curious or friendly or both. I moved back slowly till I was out of butting range, patted him weakly on the head and left. At this rate I'd die of heart failure before the night was out.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (amused)
...when you start to type "Costumer Support" instead of "Customer Support" in a business email.

*g*
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (amused)
...when you start to type "Costumer Support" instead of "Customer Support" in a business email.

*g*
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Western)

In a lighter vein than yesterday, I figured I'd pass along something that showed up in my email yesterday.

All of these are names of cities or towns in Texas. Enjoy! :)


Just Texas
Pep, Texas 79353
Smiley, Texas 78159
Paradise, Texas 76073
Rainbow, Texas 76077
Sweet Home, Texas 77987
Comfort, Texas 78013
Friendship, Texas 76530

Love the sun?
Sun City, Texas 78628
Sunrise, Texas 76661
Sunset, Texas 76270
Sundown, Texas 79372
Sunray, Texas 79086
Sunny Side, Texas 77423

Want something to eat?
Bacon, Texas 76301
Noodle, Texas 79536
Oatmeal, Texas 78605
Turkey, Texas 79261 [Location of last weekend's retro dance]
Trout, Texas 75789
Sugar Land, Texas 77479 [Current home of Bro. No. 2!]
Salty, Texas 76567
Rice, Texas 75155
Pearland, Texas 77581
Orange, Texas 77630

And top it off with:
Sweetwater, Texas 79556

Why travel to other cities? Texas has them all!
Arlington, Texas 76010
Boston, Texas 75570
Cleveland, Texas 75436
Colorado City, Texas 79512
Columbus, Texas 78934
Denver City, Texas 79323
Detroit, Texas 75436
Klondike, Texas 75448
Memphis, Texas 79245
Miami, Texas 79059
Newark, Texas 76071
Nevada, Texas 75173
Pasadena, Texas 77506
Pittsburg, Texas 75686
Reno, Texas 75462
Santa Fe, Texas 77517
Tennessee Colony, Texas 75861


Feel like traveling outside the country?
Athens, Texas 75751
Canadian, Texas 79014
China , Texas 77613
Dublin, Texas 76446
Egypt, Texas 77436
Ireland, Texas 76538
Italy, Texas 76538
London, Texas 76854
New London, Texas 75682
Odessa, Texas 79760
Palestine, Texas 75801
Paris, Texas 75460
Turkey, Texas 79261

No need to travel to Washington, D.C.
Whitehouse, Texas 75791

We even have a city named after our planet!
Earth, Texas 79031

We have a city named after our state:
Texas City, Texas 77590

Exhausted?
Energy, Texas 76452

Cold?
Blanket, Texas 76432
Winters, Texas 79567

Like to read about History?
Santa Anna, Texas 76878
Goliad, Texas 77963
Alamo, Texas 78516
Gun Barrel City, Texas 75156
Robert Lee, Texas 76945

Need office Supplies?
Staples, Texas 78670

Want to visit among the solar system?
Venus, Texas 76084
Mars, Texas 79062

You guessed it. It's on the state line.
Texline, Texas 79087

For the kids?
Kermit, Texas 79745
Elmo, Texas 75118
Nemo, Texas 76070
Tarzan, Texas 79783
Winnie, Texas 77665
Sylvester, Texas 79560

Other city names in Texas , to make you smile.
Frognot, Texas 75424
Bigfoot, Texas 78005
Hogeye, Texas 75423
Cactus, Texas 79013
Notrees, Texas 79759
Best, Texas 76932
Veribest, Texas 76886
Kickapoo, Texas 75763
Dime Box, Texas 77853
Old Dime Box, Texas 77853
Telephone, Texas 75488
Telegraph, Texas 76883
Whiteface, Texas 79379
Twitty, Texas 79079


Our favorites.
Cut and Shoot, Texas 77303
Gun Barrel City, Texas 75147
Ding Dong, Texas
West, Texas (located in Central Texas!)

and, of course,
Muleshoe, Texas 79347
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Western)

In a lighter vein than yesterday, I figured I'd pass along something that showed up in my email yesterday.

All of these are names of cities or towns in Texas. Enjoy! :)


Just Texas
Pep, Texas 79353
Smiley, Texas 78159
Paradise, Texas 76073
Rainbow, Texas 76077
Sweet Home, Texas 77987
Comfort, Texas 78013
Friendship, Texas 76530

Love the sun?
Sun City, Texas 78628
Sunrise, Texas 76661
Sunset, Texas 76270
Sundown, Texas 79372
Sunray, Texas 79086
Sunny Side, Texas 77423

Want something to eat?
Bacon, Texas 76301
Noodle, Texas 79536
Oatmeal, Texas 78605
Turkey, Texas 79261 [Location of last weekend's retro dance]
Trout, Texas 75789
Sugar Land, Texas 77479 [Current home of Bro. No. 2!]
Salty, Texas 76567
Rice, Texas 75155
Pearland, Texas 77581
Orange, Texas 77630

And top it off with:
Sweetwater, Texas 79556

Why travel to other cities? Texas has them all!
Arlington, Texas 76010
Boston, Texas 75570
Cleveland, Texas 75436
Colorado City, Texas 79512
Columbus, Texas 78934
Denver City, Texas 79323
Detroit, Texas 75436
Klondike, Texas 75448
Memphis, Texas 79245
Miami, Texas 79059
Newark, Texas 76071
Nevada, Texas 75173
Pasadena, Texas 77506
Pittsburg, Texas 75686
Reno, Texas 75462
Santa Fe, Texas 77517
Tennessee Colony, Texas 75861


Feel like traveling outside the country?
Athens, Texas 75751
Canadian, Texas 79014
China , Texas 77613
Dublin, Texas 76446
Egypt, Texas 77436
Ireland, Texas 76538
Italy, Texas 76538
London, Texas 76854
New London, Texas 75682
Odessa, Texas 79760
Palestine, Texas 75801
Paris, Texas 75460
Turkey, Texas 79261

No need to travel to Washington, D.C.
Whitehouse, Texas 75791

We even have a city named after our planet!
Earth, Texas 79031

We have a city named after our state:
Texas City, Texas 77590

Exhausted?
Energy, Texas 76452

Cold?
Blanket, Texas 76432
Winters, Texas 79567

Like to read about History?
Santa Anna, Texas 76878
Goliad, Texas 77963
Alamo, Texas 78516
Gun Barrel City, Texas 75156
Robert Lee, Texas 76945

Need office Supplies?
Staples, Texas 78670

Want to visit among the solar system?
Venus, Texas 76084
Mars, Texas 79062

You guessed it. It's on the state line.
Texline, Texas 79087

For the kids?
Kermit, Texas 79745
Elmo, Texas 75118
Nemo, Texas 76070
Tarzan, Texas 79783
Winnie, Texas 77665
Sylvester, Texas 79560

Other city names in Texas , to make you smile.
Frognot, Texas 75424
Bigfoot, Texas 78005
Hogeye, Texas 75423
Cactus, Texas 79013
Notrees, Texas 79759
Best, Texas 76932
Veribest, Texas 76886
Kickapoo, Texas 75763
Dime Box, Texas 77853
Old Dime Box, Texas 77853
Telephone, Texas 75488
Telegraph, Texas 76883
Whiteface, Texas 79379
Twitty, Texas 79079


Our favorites.
Cut and Shoot, Texas 77303
Gun Barrel City, Texas 75147
Ding Dong, Texas
West, Texas (located in Central Texas!)

and, of course,
Muleshoe, Texas 79347
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I'm sitting back and enjoying the current war controversy opinionated discussion over at [livejournal.com profile] little_details .  The original poster's question is, basically, If a guy back on a hypothethical earth roughly equivalent to 10,000 B.C. gets his legs mauled by a Big Nasty Animal, will his wounds get infected, and how likely/survivable is amptuation?

Until comment #10, the consensus of most people - particularly #5 and on - was NO! He's as dead as a doornail!  THOSE STUPID PEOPLE back then did't know squat about infection or surgery or amputation or stopping bleeding or anything!!!! And I know this because I know infection is life-threatening because it happened to ME in the 21st century!!!!1

...because no one who ever got even cut back then ever escaped infection or failed to die of it.  HA.

I do hate statements of this nature.  Especially when cited without actual evidence of any kind. O hai, archeaology? Exists.

Which is what commenter #10 proceeded to point out. Finally.


It's not as if I really even care about the subject at all. But I like truth, which includes getting a true picture of How Things Were, in all its variety and strangeness.  But people extrapolate freely from the specific to the general (Citing one's own hospitalization is evidence of what, please? Your failure to use soap and water?), and more heinously, state even a fairly accurate norm as the no-exceptions rule.  It's like the thing with weather, and temperature averages: An average is made up of a whole lot of below-averages and above-averages.  You can't take an average and then ignore everything outside like it didn't exist.

And you know what? [livejournal.com profile] little_details is about getting help for writing, not about researching for papers. Some of the best stories involve some of the wildest chances out there.  If it could happen, go ahead and write it!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
I'm sitting back and enjoying the current war controversy opinionated discussion over at [livejournal.com profile] little_details .  The original poster's question is, basically, If a guy back on a hypothethical earth roughly equivalent to 10,000 B.C. gets his legs mauled by a Big Nasty Animal, will his wounds get infected, and how likely/survivable is amptuation?

Until comment #10, the consensus of most people - particularly #5 and on - was NO! He's as dead as a doornail!  THOSE STUPID PEOPLE back then did't know squat about infection or surgery or amputation or stopping bleeding or anything!!!! And I know this because I know infection is life-threatening because it happened to ME in the 21st century!!!!1

...because no one who ever got even cut back then ever escaped infection or failed to die of it.  HA.

I do hate statements of this nature.  Especially when cited without actual evidence of any kind. O hai, archeaology? Exists.

Which is what commenter #10 proceeded to point out. Finally.


It's not as if I really even care about the subject at all. But I like truth, which includes getting a true picture of How Things Were, in all its variety and strangeness.  But people extrapolate freely from the specific to the general (Citing one's own hospitalization is evidence of what, please? Your failure to use soap and water?), and more heinously, state even a fairly accurate norm as the no-exceptions rule.  It's like the thing with weather, and temperature averages: An average is made up of a whole lot of below-averages and above-averages.  You can't take an average and then ignore everything outside like it didn't exist.

And you know what? [livejournal.com profile] little_details is about getting help for writing, not about researching for papers. Some of the best stories involve some of the wildest chances out there.  If it could happen, go ahead and write it!

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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