nuranar: (music)
Some friends had an extra ticket. Yay! I sat 6 rows from the front - pretty spectacular to be able to see that much. And it was a very good concert. A Mozart violin concerto, which was just delightful. And then, Shostakovich's 11th symphony,"The Year 1905." Very intense, "film score without the film."  An incredible experience in person. The principles were breaking bowstrings left and right. I'm so glad I went!
nuranar: (music)

Some of my favorite pieces played by the church orchestra are arrangements that combine a hymn or praise song with another, famous piece of music. Not a medley, but a style of arrangement, often with the introduction of the classical piece segueing into the hymn.

One of my favorites combines Bizet's Farandole with the hymn "Glorious Is Thy Name."  I simply cannot find a recording anywhere online, except for this video. It's unfortunately only the last minute, but I really like how the different melodies seem to alternate in this part.

Another is "You Are My All in All" with the famous/infamous Canon in D. It's a very natural combination. And unfortunately I cannot find a non-vocal, full orchestra version of it, either! This piano one appears to be the same arrangement, but it loses a lot of the depth and subtlety that all the different instruments can give.

Another one I heard again this morning (inspiring this post) is a little more unusual; it's "Victory in Jesus," but with an extended fanfare opening, repeated at the ending. It is VERY exciting music! And thanks to our local classical station, I'm reasonably sure the arranger was directly inspired by Erich Korngold's score to the Errol Flynn film "The Sea Hawk." The opening phrases at 0:07 are not identical in the hymn arrangement, but very very very close, and the arranger extends it into a fullblown fanfare. It's pretty cool. Definitely wakes everyone up for the service. ;)  I don't know the arranger (I need to ask my dad, who is in the orchestra) so I haven't even attempted to find it yet.

And finally, here's another one the orchestra has done: Fanfare and Fantasy on Lobe Den Herren. Also known as "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty." But the fanfare and fantasy part is really cool! It's not a soundtrack, but sounds like it should be. Magnificent.

The orchestra did record a CD several years ago; I think 1 or 2 of these is on there, including the Farandole. I need to find that and figure out a way to share them.

nuranar: (choir)
I'm spending a nice evening at home. Sleet hissing down like mad outside, accumulating on the streets. Definitely not going in to work tomorrow! I've got a small fire burning, too, which is super cozy. I've been doing some simple trimming on my new English bonnet. It's not the trimming for the Vernet plate, but I want to wear it to the archery thing this Saturday. So it's getting some dark brown silk ruching and a small curled ostrich plume in red.

But what really has me excited is finding some sheet music. My choir's big spring show is coming up in April. Last year it ended with an ensemble performance of "One Day More" from Les Misérables.  This year, we brainstormed and I suggested "Masquerade" from Phantom. I always wanted to figure out what all the words are!  And it took some searching, but I found the right arrangement. It's got the individual parts in it, an accompaniment that doesn't double the melody, what looks like authentic vocal scoring (including a high B flat as the highest), and it starts with Firmin and André instead of jumping into "Masquerade" immediately like every other arrangement. I'm SO looking forward to working on this!
nuranar: (mystery)
So I'm working on my buttonholes, watching the first season of "Lost in Space."  I'm not terribly familiar with it, except to know that the theme music is familiar because the marching band of A Certain University That I Cannot Name (because I don't know which one) would play it during half time at Kyle Field. (That probably makes it OU or Texas Tech.)

Anyway! I'm only on the 8th episode, "My Friend, Mr. Nobody." And I'm paying only about 60% attention throughout, because I'm trucking away on my buttonholes. But then certain strains in the music would catch my ear. At least four distinct times, probably more, I had a distinct audio double-take. It sounded just like some of the quiet, mysterious themes from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.  Totally weird! But I'm focusing on my buttonholes and on the story, and didn't consider further.

But I did expand the credits, just curious, and who did the episode music? "Johnny Williams."

Oh, yeah, that John Williams! Dang, I'm good! :D

ETA: Okay, I'm not that good. The same thing is in the next episode, and now that I'm thinking about it, it's from Raiders of the Lost Ark.  The very, very beginning - the trek through the jungle to the temple, under the opening credits.  Still, I don't think my ear is all that shabby!

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (surprise)
... I'm also listening to a Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar five-part episode from 1956 ("The Caylin Matter," a pretty good shoow), and in part 3, Johnny visits the so-called Brass Monkey Inn.  "At the Brass Monkey, they let down their hair and really lived."  Throughout the section when Johnny is yakking with the bartender, the chorus line is performing to jaunty orchestra music.  At first it's something I don't recognize; slightly 20s ragtime or early jazz.  And then it switches to "Marching Through Georgia," of all random things.

...wah?

I mean, it's a pretty catchy, upbeat tune, and all; but talk about baggage! It's certainly not unrecognizable to a good part of the population, at least not then.  At least this is in Los Angeles. There would be a RIOT in a Southern state, no kidding. You just don't do that.  It's not even so much that it's a YANKEE song. It's that it's a gleeful Yankee song about deliberately destroying Georgia.  It wasn't very nice at the time, and it still isn't.

And then the orchestra ends with "Dixie." Um.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

Since I have to. I guess.

;-)
 

 



[profile] roses_for_ann, I have you to thank for this dilemma:



Blue. And silver. And deco.  My winter coat is navy. And it's on (sort of) sale for this week, plus free shipping.  But it's still not a steal, and I certainly don't need it.  Agh! What to do?
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

Since I have to. I guess.

;-)
 

 



[profile] roses_for_ann, I have you to thank for this dilemma:



Blue. And silver. And deco.  My winter coat is navy. And it's on (sort of) sale for this week, plus free shipping.  But it's still not a steal, and I certainly don't need it.  Agh! What to do?

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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