nuranar: (adventure)
Today ends a really intense couple of weeks at work. So much going on. Too bad I don't get paid for overtime; sometimes I just can't get away. Anyway, the day got more interesting, and I'm really looking forward to the weekend. My two things:

I got to dig a splinter out of my foot this evening. I haven't had to do that in years; I guess my yard is less booby-trapped than my parents'. It took me a solid ten minutes to get it out; way over par.  It was in there pretty much straight, so the needle didn't really help. Dad's method of nail clippers really works best. And now it's surprising how much that little hole still hurts when I walk on it.

I'm reading an old (early 80s?) Star Trek novel and just ran across the most random, or most coincidental, shout-out ever.  There was a mention of a small former-Starfleet ship named Talon. Then a few paragraphs later, the Talon was mentioned again, along with another similar ship, the Sackett. Louis L'Amour, anyone?  Talon isn't uncommon, but paired with Sackett it just can't be an accident.
nuranar: (noir)
I nearly choked on my tea just now. I was finishing the cup when I heard a James Cagney impression in the middle of a work conversation a few cubicles down.

"You dirty rat!"

:D

* Obv. it's all about the intonation and delivery, not the words, when it comes to that particular time-worn impression. ;)
nuranar: (adventure)

From [livejournal.com profile] impulsereader.



So, nuranar, your LiveJournal reveals…

You are… 3% unique (blame, for example, your interest in six-day creation), 25% peculiar, 47% interesting, 16% normal and 10% herdlike (partly because you, like everyone else, enjoy thunderstorms). When it comes to friends you are popular. In terms of the way you relate to people, you are wary of trusting strangers. Your writing style (based on a recent public entry) is conventional.

Your overall weirdness is: 33


(The average level of weirdness is: 28.
You are weirder than 72% of other LJers.)


Find out what your weirdness level is!




Hee hee!

nuranar: (books)

I have the Baylor/Kentucky basketball game on. Kentucky's leading scorer of the game (who incidentally just fouled out, with under two minutes to go), is named...

Archie Goodwin.

:D

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (chill)
Highway construction is not a fun thing, as a rule. However.

When they've put up free-standing columns, or maybe rows, but not yet laid the long beams for the overpasses, it's like driving through ancient ruins in Greece. Really, it is. Especially in summer, when the sun's a bright white glare on the concrete dust all around. Or during sunrise or sunset, and you can catch a glimpse of the sky without the city around you.



Just close your eyes and imagine.

(except not when you're actually driving)

random post is not entirely random
(brought to you by Up Too Early and Planning to Drive a New Route Today)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (surprise)
... I'm also listening to a Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar five-part episode from 1956 ("The Caylin Matter," a pretty good shoow), and in part 3, Johnny visits the so-called Brass Monkey Inn.  "At the Brass Monkey, they let down their hair and really lived."  Throughout the section when Johnny is yakking with the bartender, the chorus line is performing to jaunty orchestra music.  At first it's something I don't recognize; slightly 20s ragtime or early jazz.  And then it switches to "Marching Through Georgia," of all random things.

...wah?

I mean, it's a pretty catchy, upbeat tune, and all; but talk about baggage! It's certainly not unrecognizable to a good part of the population, at least not then.  At least this is in Los Angeles. There would be a RIOT in a Southern state, no kidding. You just don't do that.  It's not even so much that it's a YANKEE song. It's that it's a gleeful Yankee song about deliberately destroying Georgia.  It wasn't very nice at the time, and it still isn't.

And then the orchestra ends with "Dixie." Um.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
[livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider posted a few days ago about seasons, and it got me thinking.  What consitute seasons?  Is it just a big enough annual temperature swing?  Or is it having four mostly-distinct seasons?  Because my corner of Texas certainly qualifies as having seasons for the first, but not for the second.  Unless the accepted measure of "spring" and "fall" are different than mine.  Ironically, for all my tolerance of heat, I have a very narrow comfortable range; there are very few spring and fall days that satisfy me.

Ramble ramble ramble )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
[livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider posted a few days ago about seasons, and it got me thinking.  What consitute seasons?  Is it just a big enough annual temperature swing?  Or is it having four mostly-distinct seasons?  Because my corner of Texas certainly qualifies as having seasons for the first, but not for the second.  Unless the accepted measure of "spring" and "fall" are different than mine.  Ironically, for all my tolerance of heat, I have a very narrow comfortable range; there are very few spring and fall days that satisfy me.

Ramble ramble ramble )

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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