nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (victory)
I now officially hold a Master's degree in Professional Accounting.

WHOOP!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (victory)
I now officially hold a Master's degree in Professional Accounting.

WHOOP!
nuranar: (reading)
This one from [livejournal.com profile] seawasp


1) What author do you own the most books by? Not sure. With the weekend's acquisitions, I have 32 Saint books, so that's probably the highest.  The Agatha Christie and Nancy Drew collections surpass that, but both are jointly owned by my mother and I. And the majority of the Louis L'Amours are Nathan's.

2) What book do you own the most copies of? With far too little space for the books, I don't like having multiple copies of many things unless there's a reason for a particular edition. I have duplicates of some Austens and Sherlock Holmes, but I think the winner is Bibles, with five. In length-of-ownership order, I have the Living Bible I was given for Christmas in... 1989, I think; the NIV I got for Xmas in 1992 or 1993; a slimmer NIV, this time from the church, upon my high school graduation in 2001; an 1855 pocket-sized KJV I bought on ebay while in college to use for 1860s reenacting, and which I often carry to church because it's the smallest; and the NIV study Bible given to me by Mr. and Mrs. Klob when I graduated from college in 2005.

3) Did it bother you that both those questions ended with prepositions? Nope. Sometimes I try to avoid it in my writing, but only when it doesn't sound too contrived.

4) What fictional character are you secretly in love with? Oh, I love Richard Diamond, but that's hardly a secret; and he is a radio character, not a book character. There's plenty of others I could love, but none come to mind right now when I want them.

5) What book have you read the most times in your life? Err.  I never keep count. The Bible, Ben-Hur, Alistair MacLean's Where Eagles Dare and The Golden Rendezvous, Rifles for Watie, maybe Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime and The Man in the Brown Suit; probably lots more. I love to re-read.

6) What was your favourite book when you were ten years old? Nothing stands out; probably a Nancy Drew. I read all of Mom's before I was 8, and I added to the collection for years.  I also loved The Black Stallion; it's one of the earliest books I remember reading, certainly before first grade.  I would have read it to death except that I never owned it.

7) What is the worst book you’ve read in the past year? Not sure. Probably the book I stumbled across on Project Gutenberg that ends unhappily, with the central character going rather nuts - after the reader's been suckered into really really rooting for him and the woman. I loathe books wherein the main character(s) really, truly are insane.

8) What is the best book you’ve read in the past year? Impossible to say. Thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, it's a choice among hundreds.

9) If you could force everyone you know to read one book, what would it be? I can't think of one. People tend to hate what they are forced to do. I sure do!

10) Who deserves to win the next Nobel Prize for Literature? Not a clue.

11) What book would you most like to see made into a movie? There was something I was thinking about recently, but I'm dashed if I can think of it now... I would love to see the Lensman books made into good movies, but there's No Way In The Universe that's going to be done acceptably.

12) What book would you least like to see made into a movie? There's an ocean of drivel that should never be given the shred of dignity conferred by movie release. And then there's the Lensman books, as I just mentioned; honestly, I would cringe if I heard they were being filmed, because they wouldn't be right.

13) Describe your weirdest dream involving a writer, book, or literary character. I don't remember my dreams. This phenomenon has long been a cause for passing puzzlement and frustration.

14) What is the most lowbrow book you’ve read as an adult? I have no pretense to any brow. This question and all its implications annoys me.

15) What is the most difficult book you’ve ever read? Maybe the textbook for discrete mathematics, although I don't remember a thing about it. It's more likely the first programming text I had, since it hopelessly confounded me for the first fourteen minutes and put me to sleep within the fifteenth.

16) What is the most obscure Shakespeare play you’ve seen? Neither The Tempest nor King Lear is obscure, methinks.

17) Do you prefer the French or the Russians? As authors, neither. Judging from what I've read, French, for the sake of Victor Hugo and Jules Verne.

18) Roth or Updike?  Who?

19) David Sedaris or Dave Eggers? Who?

20) Shakespeare, Milton, or Chaucer? Shakespeare. I haven't read enough Milton to know for sure, though.

21) Austen or Eliot? Austen.

22) What is the biggest or most embarrassing gap in your reading? The biggest gap would probably be the so-called "Lost Generation" writers, both American and British. I have little-to-zero interest in the worldview of those writers or the content of their writings, and no plans to ever close that "gap" in my reading.  I'm not embarrassed about this gap.  I do wish I had read more 19th-century literature back when I had more time and less tired brain cells, but it's still a strength in my reading and I'm planning to continue.

23) What is your favourite novel? Another impossible question. I'd probably have a list of 50, even if I limited favorite authors to one book. The ones I've read multiple times are there.

24) Play? The translation of Molière's Tartuffe, or The Hypocrite in my high school lit book is hilarious and made of awesome. (So is Wishbone's version of The Hypochondriac!)  I want to find out which translator did it and get Tartuffe, and others if possible, by him.

25) Poem? Not sure. Maybe If.

26) Essay? Either "On Faerie Stories" or one of C. S. Lewis's writing ones, such as "On Writing for Children" or "On Science Fiction."

27) Short story? I have no idea. There are way too many to tell, especially considering the SF ones.

28) Work of non-fiction?  The Bible. Aside from that, Costume in Detail. I've pored over the drawings in that book for years, and it still never fails to fascinate me.

29) Who is your favourite writer? I can't pick one. Alastair MacLean is waay up there.

30) Who is the most overrated writer alive today? No idea. I read little that was published in the last 10, 20, or 30 years.  I'd take a stab at Stephanie Meyer, but for all the raving I haven't heard anyone actually building up her writing.  (I don't seek out such discussion, though.)

31) What is your desert island book? Swiss Family Robinson.

32) And… what are you reading right now? LJ, with forays to Wikipedia (drama on the Lost Generation talk page, ahoy!), Amazon, and my tags list, to garner links.
nuranar: (reading)
This one from [livejournal.com profile] seawasp


1) What author do you own the most books by? Not sure. With the weekend's acquisitions, I have 32 Saint books, so that's probably the highest.  The Agatha Christie and Nancy Drew collections surpass that, but both are jointly owned by my mother and I. And the majority of the Louis L'Amours are Nathan's.

2) What book do you own the most copies of? With far too little space for the books, I don't like having multiple copies of many things unless there's a reason for a particular edition. I have duplicates of some Austens and Sherlock Holmes, but I think the winner is Bibles, with five. In length-of-ownership order, I have the Living Bible I was given for Christmas in... 1989, I think; the NIV I got for Xmas in 1992 or 1993; a slimmer NIV, this time from the church, upon my high school graduation in 2001; an 1855 pocket-sized KJV I bought on ebay while in college to use for 1860s reenacting, and which I often carry to church because it's the smallest; and the NIV study Bible given to me by Mr. and Mrs. Klob when I graduated from college in 2005.

3) Did it bother you that both those questions ended with prepositions? Nope. Sometimes I try to avoid it in my writing, but only when it doesn't sound too contrived.

4) What fictional character are you secretly in love with? Oh, I love Richard Diamond, but that's hardly a secret; and he is a radio character, not a book character. There's plenty of others I could love, but none come to mind right now when I want them.

5) What book have you read the most times in your life? Err.  I never keep count. The Bible, Ben-Hur, Alistair MacLean's Where Eagles Dare and The Golden Rendezvous, Rifles for Watie, maybe Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime and The Man in the Brown Suit; probably lots more. I love to re-read.

6) What was your favourite book when you were ten years old? Nothing stands out; probably a Nancy Drew. I read all of Mom's before I was 8, and I added to the collection for years.  I also loved The Black Stallion; it's one of the earliest books I remember reading, certainly before first grade.  I would have read it to death except that I never owned it.

7) What is the worst book you’ve read in the past year? Not sure. Probably the book I stumbled across on Project Gutenberg that ends unhappily, with the central character going rather nuts - after the reader's been suckered into really really rooting for him and the woman. I loathe books wherein the main character(s) really, truly are insane.

8) What is the best book you’ve read in the past year? Impossible to say. Thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, it's a choice among hundreds.

9) If you could force everyone you know to read one book, what would it be? I can't think of one. People tend to hate what they are forced to do. I sure do!

10) Who deserves to win the next Nobel Prize for Literature? Not a clue.

11) What book would you most like to see made into a movie? There was something I was thinking about recently, but I'm dashed if I can think of it now... I would love to see the Lensman books made into good movies, but there's No Way In The Universe that's going to be done acceptably.

12) What book would you least like to see made into a movie? There's an ocean of drivel that should never be given the shred of dignity conferred by movie release. And then there's the Lensman books, as I just mentioned; honestly, I would cringe if I heard they were being filmed, because they wouldn't be right.

13) Describe your weirdest dream involving a writer, book, or literary character. I don't remember my dreams. This phenomenon has long been a cause for passing puzzlement and frustration.

14) What is the most lowbrow book you’ve read as an adult? I have no pretense to any brow. This question and all its implications annoys me.

15) What is the most difficult book you’ve ever read? Maybe the textbook for discrete mathematics, although I don't remember a thing about it. It's more likely the first programming text I had, since it hopelessly confounded me for the first fourteen minutes and put me to sleep within the fifteenth.

16) What is the most obscure Shakespeare play you’ve seen? Neither The Tempest nor King Lear is obscure, methinks.

17) Do you prefer the French or the Russians? As authors, neither. Judging from what I've read, French, for the sake of Victor Hugo and Jules Verne.

18) Roth or Updike?  Who?

19) David Sedaris or Dave Eggers? Who?

20) Shakespeare, Milton, or Chaucer? Shakespeare. I haven't read enough Milton to know for sure, though.

21) Austen or Eliot? Austen.

22) What is the biggest or most embarrassing gap in your reading? The biggest gap would probably be the so-called "Lost Generation" writers, both American and British. I have little-to-zero interest in the worldview of those writers or the content of their writings, and no plans to ever close that "gap" in my reading.  I'm not embarrassed about this gap.  I do wish I had read more 19th-century literature back when I had more time and less tired brain cells, but it's still a strength in my reading and I'm planning to continue.

23) What is your favourite novel? Another impossible question. I'd probably have a list of 50, even if I limited favorite authors to one book. The ones I've read multiple times are there.

24) Play? The translation of Molière's Tartuffe, or The Hypocrite in my high school lit book is hilarious and made of awesome. (So is Wishbone's version of The Hypochondriac!)  I want to find out which translator did it and get Tartuffe, and others if possible, by him.

25) Poem? Not sure. Maybe If.

26) Essay? Either "On Faerie Stories" or one of C. S. Lewis's writing ones, such as "On Writing for Children" or "On Science Fiction."

27) Short story? I have no idea. There are way too many to tell, especially considering the SF ones.

28) Work of non-fiction?  The Bible. Aside from that, Costume in Detail. I've pored over the drawings in that book for years, and it still never fails to fascinate me.

29) Who is your favourite writer? I can't pick one. Alastair MacLean is waay up there.

30) Who is the most overrated writer alive today? No idea. I read little that was published in the last 10, 20, or 30 years.  I'd take a stab at Stephanie Meyer, but for all the raving I haven't heard anyone actually building up her writing.  (I don't seek out such discussion, though.)

31) What is your desert island book? Swiss Family Robinson.

32) And… what are you reading right now? LJ, with forays to Wikipedia (drama on the Lost Generation talk page, ahoy!), Amazon, and my tags list, to garner links.

SNOW

11 February 2010 04:20 pm
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)
The snow has stopped for the first time in 12+ hours.  Not to worry, though; we're just in a hole in the storm, according to the radar. It should pick up again soon and continue for much of the night.

UTA finally cancelled classes beginning at 3:00.  Choir rehearsal is cancelled, too.  Free evening!... once I get home.


The temperature has stayed pretty much at 33 all day.  Byron made it here for his internship interview just fine.  He said there's no ice on the roads yet.  That'll change in a couple hours when the temperatures drop.


Here, and at home, there was about 4" of snow at 1:00.  There are predictions of 6-8" for storm totals.  The weight of the snow on tree branches is causing power outages, not to mention this collapsed carport/awning.  It's at at an apartment complex less than 10 minutes' walk from my house.



Outside Jerry World The Mothership Cowboys Stadium in Arlington.


My mother has lived in Arlington since the mid 1960s.  She's never seen snow like this, not even in the horrible cold of 1983-4.  Needless to say, this blows the Christmas Eve snowfall out of the water.  I just checked, and the records for total February snowfall are:

1.  13.5" (1978)
2.  7.5" (1924)
3. 4.2" (1951)

I think we'll set a new #3, if not #2.  Just from one storm.  The Valentine's Day snow in 2004 wasn't even on the list.  It's definitely going to be listed on the Significant Snow Events page.


One last picture, from Plano. (Definitely not the most snow, but very pretty.)

SNOW

11 February 2010 04:20 pm
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)
The snow has stopped for the first time in 12+ hours.  Not to worry, though; we're just in a hole in the storm, according to the radar. It should pick up again soon and continue for much of the night.

UTA finally cancelled classes beginning at 3:00.  Choir rehearsal is cancelled, too.  Free evening!... once I get home.


The temperature has stayed pretty much at 33 all day.  Byron made it here for his internship interview just fine.  He said there's no ice on the roads yet.  That'll change in a couple hours when the temperatures drop.


Here, and at home, there was about 4" of snow at 1:00.  There are predictions of 6-8" for storm totals.  The weight of the snow on tree branches is causing power outages, not to mention this collapsed carport/awning.  It's at at an apartment complex less than 10 minutes' walk from my house.



Outside Jerry World The Mothership Cowboys Stadium in Arlington.


My mother has lived in Arlington since the mid 1960s.  She's never seen snow like this, not even in the horrible cold of 1983-4.  Needless to say, this blows the Christmas Eve snowfall out of the water.  I just checked, and the records for total February snowfall are:

1.  13.5" (1978)
2.  7.5" (1924)
3. 4.2" (1951)

I think we'll set a new #3, if not #2.  Just from one storm.  The Valentine's Day snow in 2004 wasn't even on the list.  It's definitely going to be listed on the Significant Snow Events page.


One last picture, from Plano. (Definitely not the most snow, but very pretty.)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)

Winter weather is so tricky! There were forecasts for at least two potential winter-precipitation events in January, and they fizzled with a capital F. And this morning at 5 AM, there was a good inch of snow on the grass and cars, where no accumulation had been predicted until the day.  It's such a fine balance of factors for us - moist air, cool air, front coming at the right time of day, &c. - that makes accurate prediction so incredibly hard. (This unpredictability, or volatility, is what gives us our hailstorms and tornados and other fine things as well.)

Temperatures are hovering right around freezing. The snow is fluffy and wet, unlike the Christmas Eve blizzard which was dry.  This means that Dad and I had a rare commute through snow and slush, without ice.  Truly a novelty, I assure you.  We saw only a couple of stalled cars on the whole 25 miles of freeway.

Fortunately, or unfortunately, we're nowhere near done with the snow. It's still coming down steadily.  Updated forecasts are for 3-4 inches total even in the metro area. Of course there is more to the north and west.

Snow is so pretty! Being wet, it's clinging to all the leaves and branches. The Christmas snow was not only dry, so it didn't cling so well, but the blizzard conditions meant wind that kept it from just resting on things.  It's piled up now, though, even on the bare branches of the peach trees next door, and all the live oak leaves. One fellow at work said the junipers lining his driveway were covered in it, all feathery and pretty.

TCU has canceled classes, but so far UTA hasn't.  If they don't, Dad and I will just leave work early so I can get home, then to school from there.  Byron has an interview here for an internship early this afternoon. I hope either that the roads aren't bad at all, or that they're so bad he has reason not to come! A lot can happen in a 25-mile drive.

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)

Winter weather is so tricky! There were forecasts for at least two potential winter-precipitation events in January, and they fizzled with a capital F. And this morning at 5 AM, there was a good inch of snow on the grass and cars, where no accumulation had been predicted until the day.  It's such a fine balance of factors for us - moist air, cool air, front coming at the right time of day, &c. - that makes accurate prediction so incredibly hard. (This unpredictability, or volatility, is what gives us our hailstorms and tornados and other fine things as well.)

Temperatures are hovering right around freezing. The snow is fluffy and wet, unlike the Christmas Eve blizzard which was dry.  This means that Dad and I had a rare commute through snow and slush, without ice.  Truly a novelty, I assure you.  We saw only a couple of stalled cars on the whole 25 miles of freeway.

Fortunately, or unfortunately, we're nowhere near done with the snow. It's still coming down steadily.  Updated forecasts are for 3-4 inches total even in the metro area. Of course there is more to the north and west.

Snow is so pretty! Being wet, it's clinging to all the leaves and branches. The Christmas snow was not only dry, so it didn't cling so well, but the blizzard conditions meant wind that kept it from just resting on things.  It's piled up now, though, even on the bare branches of the peach trees next door, and all the live oak leaves. One fellow at work said the junipers lining his driveway were covered in it, all feathery and pretty.

TCU has canceled classes, but so far UTA hasn't.  If they don't, Dad and I will just leave work early so I can get home, then to school from there.  Byron has an interview here for an internship early this afternoon. I hope either that the roads aren't bad at all, or that they're so bad he has reason not to come! A lot can happen in a 25-mile drive.

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1930s)
I've been tagged by [livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider!

Seven things... )

I tried to work on the database project last night, but it's kind of tricky. As in I don't really understand what the end result is supposed to be and what the hints/suggestions in the assignments mean. I've had a little bit of help from the professor, but he wants to wait until class Thursday before discussing them. I do understand that, much as I'd like to get this out of the way; it's not due until next Tuesday.

So instead of spending the evening possibly getting a little done on the project, I'm going to do some sewing. And since I have a whole evening, instead of spending it on the chemise or something, I think I'll work on the lounging pyjamas. I don't think I'm going to muslin this, since they're just pyjamas and my usual fitting issue shouldn't be much of a problem. I still need to iron and trace or just go ahead and cut out the pattern.

Speaking of cutting out, I still really would like input on how to do this two-tone thing. My main color is gray, and my contrast is a deep red/raspberry. I'm going the long-sleeve view.



Of course collar and cuffs will be raspberry. But what about the top/jacket part? I'm not sure how much rasperry I've got. Probably less than a yard. If one part of the top could be raspberry-colored, should it be the top or the midriff? And what about the sleeves?


The weather's being naughty again... )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1930s)
I've been tagged by [livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider!

Seven things... )

I tried to work on the database project last night, but it's kind of tricky. As in I don't really understand what the end result is supposed to be and what the hints/suggestions in the assignments mean. I've had a little bit of help from the professor, but he wants to wait until class Thursday before discussing them. I do understand that, much as I'd like to get this out of the way; it's not due until next Tuesday.

So instead of spending the evening possibly getting a little done on the project, I'm going to do some sewing. And since I have a whole evening, instead of spending it on the chemise or something, I think I'll work on the lounging pyjamas. I don't think I'm going to muslin this, since they're just pyjamas and my usual fitting issue shouldn't be much of a problem. I still need to iron and trace or just go ahead and cut out the pattern.

Speaking of cutting out, I still really would like input on how to do this two-tone thing. My main color is gray, and my contrast is a deep red/raspberry. I'm going the long-sleeve view.



Of course collar and cuffs will be raspberry. But what about the top/jacket part? I'm not sure how much rasperry I've got. Probably less than a yard. If one part of the top could be raspberry-colored, should it be the top or the midriff? And what about the sleeves?


The weather's being naughty again... )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Dangerous Books)
Well, we didn't get a thing except some pretty views of storm clouds, but apparently Canton got plastered by a tornado.  Mom said this morning that 50-60 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed. That's pretty significant. I hope [livejournal.com profile] bonatirer and her house are okay! She's had enough troubles.

Today is a little bit cooler - high below 70 - and less humid, and the wind is still brisk but from the west instead of the south. (Hence the lower humidity.)  Looks like the wind will keep up through Monday at least, from various directions.

Tornado in January. *shakes head*


In other news, I think this class will be fun, or at least the programming part; later on we'll be applying the stuff somehow to a real business and its accounting cycle, and that sounds less interesting to me. But VB sounds a lot easier to work in than Java or C++, since so much stuff is already pre-programmed.  So a programmer can focus on what the program actually does, instead of so much effort on the visual display.

As a matter of fact, I read the first chapter in the Visual Basic textbook last night and I was actually excited when I finished it. "Stop the presses!", right? I rarely enjoyed reading any of my textbooks, much less my computer books.  But this book makes sense.  The first chapter gives a 50,000-foot level overview of why programming?, Why Visual Basic?, good programming principles, thumbnail sketch of where VB came from, etc.; all in all, what I'd expect from a textbook first chapter, but surprisingly with more practical information and less nebulous.  The real surprise, though, is how easy to understand it is.  Yes, I have a computer science minor, so I knew a goodish bit of the programming info.  But I have never ever had a textbook that was even remotely as readable as this one.  All of my computer texts used the typical programming jargon that I had to force myself to concentrate on, to read carefully and have to guess from context at the meaning. And I'm not stupid, and I've always been a fast reader with high comprehension.  This book, though, is truly a teaching text, that explains not only What but Why, yet in ordinary language.  It's really pretty awesome.

If you're curious and it's either that or watch paint dry, give the first chapter a shot. The whole textbook is available for free on the professor's website.


A drawback to the course is that at least for a while, I'll have to be taking my laptop to school. We'll be working in Visual Basic 2008, but the lab computers only have VB 2005. They won't have 2008 installed until the school get some sort of licensing issue worked out.  (I work in contracts and have dealt with licensing myself, so I'm not holding my breath that that'll happen any time soon.)  It's not that I mind working on my computer, of course; it's a nice computer and I like my military surplus bag that doesn't look at all like a laptop bag.  But it's rather heavy.  And not only do I have to walk from my car to the school building, I have to take it from my car to my work building and back, for no other reason than I'd better not leave it in the car all day. *sigh*
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Dangerous Books)
Well, we didn't get a thing except some pretty views of storm clouds, but apparently Canton got plastered by a tornado.  Mom said this morning that 50-60 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed. That's pretty significant. I hope [livejournal.com profile] bonatirer and her house are okay! She's had enough troubles.

Today is a little bit cooler - high below 70 - and less humid, and the wind is still brisk but from the west instead of the south. (Hence the lower humidity.)  Looks like the wind will keep up through Monday at least, from various directions.

Tornado in January. *shakes head*


In other news, I think this class will be fun, or at least the programming part; later on we'll be applying the stuff somehow to a real business and its accounting cycle, and that sounds less interesting to me. But VB sounds a lot easier to work in than Java or C++, since so much stuff is already pre-programmed.  So a programmer can focus on what the program actually does, instead of so much effort on the visual display.

As a matter of fact, I read the first chapter in the Visual Basic textbook last night and I was actually excited when I finished it. "Stop the presses!", right? I rarely enjoyed reading any of my textbooks, much less my computer books.  But this book makes sense.  The first chapter gives a 50,000-foot level overview of why programming?, Why Visual Basic?, good programming principles, thumbnail sketch of where VB came from, etc.; all in all, what I'd expect from a textbook first chapter, but surprisingly with more practical information and less nebulous.  The real surprise, though, is how easy to understand it is.  Yes, I have a computer science minor, so I knew a goodish bit of the programming info.  But I have never ever had a textbook that was even remotely as readable as this one.  All of my computer texts used the typical programming jargon that I had to force myself to concentrate on, to read carefully and have to guess from context at the meaning. And I'm not stupid, and I've always been a fast reader with high comprehension.  This book, though, is truly a teaching text, that explains not only What but Why, yet in ordinary language.  It's really pretty awesome.

If you're curious and it's either that or watch paint dry, give the first chapter a shot. The whole textbook is available for free on the professor's website.


A drawback to the course is that at least for a while, I'll have to be taking my laptop to school. We'll be working in Visual Basic 2008, but the lab computers only have VB 2005. They won't have 2008 installed until the school get some sort of licensing issue worked out.  (I work in contracts and have dealt with licensing myself, so I'm not holding my breath that that'll happen any time soon.)  It's not that I mind working on my computer, of course; it's a nice computer and I like my military surplus bag that doesn't look at all like a laptop bag.  But it's rather heavy.  And not only do I have to walk from my car to the school building, I have to take it from my car to my work building and back, for no other reason than I'd better not leave it in the car all day. *sigh*
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
My first class held in a computer lab. :D I doubt I'll be goofing around much, though. Just wanted to post 'cause I could.

The weather, by the way, is being nuts again.  The high today was around 70, and tomorrow should be about 75.  I'm enjoying it and I think I'm tired of cold weather. But will it stay this pleasant? HAH!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
My first class held in a computer lab. :D I doubt I'll be goofing around much, though. Just wanted to post 'cause I could.

The weather, by the way, is being nuts again.  The high today was around 70, and tomorrow should be about 75.  I'm enjoying it and I think I'm tired of cold weather. But will it stay this pleasant? HAH!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The problem with not making time to update one's blog is that when one does make time, one has enough words for a round dozen entries. And who wants to read that? *sigh*

Weather first!

This is going to be a hot summer.

Cue lots of rambling about weather. Told you I don't know when to stop. )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The problem with not making time to update one's blog is that when one does make time, one has enough words for a round dozen entries. And who wants to read that? *sigh*

Weather first!

This is going to be a hot summer.

Cue lots of rambling about weather. Told you I don't know when to stop. )
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
No sewing tonight. Got a bad headache at work. Made it through the rest of the day, the drive home, and class, but now Mums is sending me to bed.

I didn't get any studying done last night, either. Nor have I yet ordered that blasted textbook. Bah.

I did read nearly an entire Fantasy & Science Fiction magazine, though, trying to get to Dickson's "St. Dragon and the George."  [livejournal.com profile] jordannamorgan, 'twas good and 'tis going on the wishlists.

And I did at least mark the hem. Good, since it was more of a pain than I thought it'd be.  But because I have to go to bed I won't be finishing it tonight to wear tomorrow.


Severe thunderstorm up on the Red River tonight - very large hail and potential tornado last I saw.  We largely missed out on yesterdays's unessential excitement, along with the essential rainfall.  Less than .5" in that whole mess of storms. Double Bah.  And Winter Rides Again tomorrow.  Tonight's low: 63.  Tomorrow's high: 62.  (Figure that one out.)  Temperature falling to 44 by 5 pm.

Texas doesn't have a real Spring season.  It's called a couple of months of Extreme Weather Seesaw.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
No sewing tonight. Got a bad headache at work. Made it through the rest of the day, the drive home, and class, but now Mums is sending me to bed.

I didn't get any studying done last night, either. Nor have I yet ordered that blasted textbook. Bah.

I did read nearly an entire Fantasy & Science Fiction magazine, though, trying to get to Dickson's "St. Dragon and the George."  [livejournal.com profile] jordannamorgan, 'twas good and 'tis going on the wishlists.

And I did at least mark the hem. Good, since it was more of a pain than I thought it'd be.  But because I have to go to bed I won't be finishing it tonight to wear tomorrow.


Severe thunderstorm up on the Red River tonight - very large hail and potential tornado last I saw.  We largely missed out on yesterdays's unessential excitement, along with the essential rainfall.  Less than .5" in that whole mess of storms. Double Bah.  And Winter Rides Again tomorrow.  Tonight's low: 63.  Tomorrow's high: 62.  (Figure that one out.)  Temperature falling to 44 by 5 pm.

Texas doesn't have a real Spring season.  It's called a couple of months of Extreme Weather Seesaw.
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The test was hard.  Very hard.  I've never had a professor want so much extrapolation during the test.  I know it's legitimate for a professor to test on anything in the text; but usually they stick to the problems and examples that were assigned instead of pulling out new stuff.  It's nice when they see tests as a measure of how much they taught the students, not as a measure of how fanatical about studying  the students are.

I don't want to go through it, but please pray that God's leading will be clear for me in this whole school thing.  I'm working on the grad degree, in accounting.  I do not like going to school.  I've been doing this for a year and a half and it's still a struggle.  Is God telling me to drop everything but work and school?  Take only one instead of two classes?  Go in another direction entirely?  I really, really don't know.  Please pray that my parents' counsel will be wise, too.  Pray that I'll listen to Him.

In other news:  I am thoroughly motivated to get stuff done.  Unlike the end of most semesters, when all I want to do is let my brain turn to mush for a few weeks, I'm really energized to attack all the other stuff that's been building up.  I'm currently taking a break from preparing certain people's surprises.  Muahaha!

Aspen, your package was waiting for me when I got home last night at 11:15!  I'm so excited!  I cannot open this book until I get stuff done, though.  But now it's pleasurable anticipation instead of sullen fine-I'll-study-instead-ness. *g*

And now, the quote of the day.  I do so love adventure fiction - especially when there's humor in it.  Cracking good movies made from cracking good adventure yarns really, er, light my fire as well.

Smith and Schaeffer have just torched a German train station, sort of accidentally on purpose.

Schaffer said:  "They're not going to be very pleased."

"I shouldn't think so."

"They're really going to go after us now.  They've Doberman pinschers up at the castle and I've no doubt they have them at the camp too.  They've only to bring them to the station, sniff our packs, have them circle the station, pick up our scent and that's it.  Smith and Schaffer torn to shreds.  I'll take on the Alpenkorps one-by-one but I draw the line at Doberman pinschers, boss."

"I thought it was horses you were scared of?" Smith said mildly.

"Horses, Doberman pinschers, you name it, I'm scared of it.  All it's got to have is four feet."  He looked gloomily at the burning station.  "I'd make a rotten vet."

Alistair MacLean, Where Eagles Dare

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
The test was hard.  Very hard.  I've never had a professor want so much extrapolation during the test.  I know it's legitimate for a professor to test on anything in the text; but usually they stick to the problems and examples that were assigned instead of pulling out new stuff.  It's nice when they see tests as a measure of how much they taught the students, not as a measure of how fanatical about studying  the students are.

I don't want to go through it, but please pray that God's leading will be clear for me in this whole school thing.  I'm working on the grad degree, in accounting.  I do not like going to school.  I've been doing this for a year and a half and it's still a struggle.  Is God telling me to drop everything but work and school?  Take only one instead of two classes?  Go in another direction entirely?  I really, really don't know.  Please pray that my parents' counsel will be wise, too.  Pray that I'll listen to Him.

In other news:  I am thoroughly motivated to get stuff done.  Unlike the end of most semesters, when all I want to do is let my brain turn to mush for a few weeks, I'm really energized to attack all the other stuff that's been building up.  I'm currently taking a break from preparing certain people's surprises.  Muahaha!

Aspen, your package was waiting for me when I got home last night at 11:15!  I'm so excited!  I cannot open this book until I get stuff done, though.  But now it's pleasurable anticipation instead of sullen fine-I'll-study-instead-ness. *g*

And now, the quote of the day.  I do so love adventure fiction - especially when there's humor in it.  Cracking good movies made from cracking good adventure yarns really, er, light my fire as well.

Smith and Schaeffer have just torched a German train station, sort of accidentally on purpose.

Schaffer said:  "They're not going to be very pleased."

"I shouldn't think so."

"They're really going to go after us now.  They've Doberman pinschers up at the castle and I've no doubt they have them at the camp too.  They've only to bring them to the station, sniff our packs, have them circle the station, pick up our scent and that's it.  Smith and Schaffer torn to shreds.  I'll take on the Alpenkorps one-by-one but I draw the line at Doberman pinschers, boss."

"I thought it was horses you were scared of?" Smith said mildly.

"Horses, Doberman pinschers, you name it, I'm scared of it.  All it's got to have is four feet."  He looked gloomily at the burning station.  "I'd make a rotten vet."

Alistair MacLean, Where Eagles Dare

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