nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)

I spent a rather frustrating Wednesday evening. I did wear the stays around, which was good for them. But I broke the tape lace again. (This is developing into a very bad habit!) I scaled up and printed some patterns, which was good. I also estimated yardage for a few purchases. But I got myself worn out trying to decide how to make a period-appropriate 1916 petticoat (i.e. one that helps the skirt stick out) with a minimum of new fabric and work. (The catalogs full of silk taffeta petticoats with rows of tiny frills and bigger flounces and cutwork were not helping.) (I think I've decided just to settle for pimatex with three flounces [of pimatex or stiff organdy] and starch from there.) And also trying to estimate what lace I need for the princess slip and the envelope chemise. Ugh. This stage is just paralyzing!

So I need to make a master list, for each piece of each outfit if necessary, outlining specifically what patterns I need, what I will use, and what I need to buy/source.


1780s white silk Romney
Source: Portrait of Mrs. Moody
Materials have: white silk, pink silk, fine cotton for ruffles, linen lining
Materials need: button forms for cuffs
Pattern: Fit a basic 1780s block, starting from 1780s gown in POF p. 40, then altering for this to a straight front and back waist and fuller front with tucked (?) casing. 

1780s sprigged silk
Source: _____________ (several possibilities - separate brainstorming post)
Materials have: sprigged silk, linen lining, ivory striped sheer silk for ruffles
Materials need: trim?
Pattern: ______________ (also part of the brainstorming! I've never done a sacque-back gown and I'm getting scared)

1810s yellow muslin
Source: here and here
Materials have: yellow muslin, lining, cording
Materials need: nope
Pattern: hopefully something with the wide-set sleeves c. 1815. Either start with my white muslin pattern from years ago and try to fill in the armhole a bit, or use (a) 1818 pelisse from POF or (b) 1816 evening dress from Cut of Women's Clothes. Maybe do like [profile] the_aristocat and just free-hand trace it from my pattern and modify according to the two samples. ;)

also needed:
* 1810s shift 1 - nearly finished
* 1810s shift 2 - cut out, needs assembly
* 1810s petticoat (shorter and fuller, maybe with cord in hem) - use Pimatex
 Materials need: cotton cord for hem
 Pattern: narrower version of Skirt D from Hunnisett

1910s Envelope Chemise
Source: article from [personal profile] fancyfrocks's magazine, dated 1916
Materials have:
Materials need: batiste from Farmhouse Fabrics; __ yds various lace
Pattern: pattern from [personal profile] fancyfrocks

1910s Corset
Source: none really; reference above article
Materials have: white brocade coutil; garters (search "hose supporters" on ebay for the wide ones), lace
Materials need: busk, boning, corset lace
Pattern: [personal profile] jenthompson's pattern

1910s Brassiere
Source: article again, confirming what was worn in 1916
Materials have: probably Pimatex
Materials need: boning (probably)
Pattern: article/pattern for hooked brassiere, from [personal profile] jenthompson

1910s Princess Slip
Source: n/a
Materials have: some lace
Materials need: batiste from Farmhouse Fabrics; 2.5 yds narrow beading for minimum
Pattern: pattern from [personal profile] fancyfrocks

1910s Petticoat
Source: catalogs from [personal profile] fancyfrocks, showing the crisp taffeta petticoats necessary to hold out the flared skirts of 1916
Materials have: Pimatex cotton, super stiff "cambric" (have 2 1/4 yds, 39" wide)
Materials need: 18 yds edging if I do three frills and edge them all, stiff organdy from Pure Silks if it's better than Pimatex or there's not enough cambric
Pattern: princess slip pattern as base, using circular flounce; mount flounces on it

1910s Empire Negligee
Source: May Manton pattern
Materials: white crossbarred muslin, pink silk ribbon & lace trim unused from 1860s sheer
Materials need: none
Pattern: same as the source

1916 Blue Sprig Dress
Source: middle dress, from a 1916 catalog owned by [personal profile] fancyfrocks
Materials: semisheer white cotton with woven openwork and woven dots, printed with a blue sprig pattern, very similar to the catalog picture. Blue silk taffeta left over from the Star dress for the sash and buttons. Some nice cotton for collar and cuffs.
Materials need: pleated net for collar and cuffs trimming
Pattern: waist and skirt patterns from [personal profile] fancyfrocks

1920s Bandeau
Source: n/a
Materials have: vintage pink medium-heavy rayon satin from antique mall
Materials need: 3+ yards 1/2" ribbon for straps; 2" wide elastic (pink if possible)
Pattern: Women's Wear of the 1920s

1920s Teddy
Source: Les modes, showing this as the most common/fashionable undies
Materials have: some lace; white silk ribbon
Materials need: white crêpe de chine from Dharma
Pattern: Women's Wear of the 1920s

1920s Pannier
Source: shape from model image
Materials have: narrow steel hoop wire
Materials need: black silk organza from Dharma
Pattern: Costume Close-Up and 1920s example with similar a-line shape

1920s Navy Beaded Robe de Style
Source: 1 and 2
Materials have: navy silk; cotton for lining
Materials need: beads, cotton net, organza for lining (maybe)
Pattern: pattern from [personal profile] fancyfrocks and Women's Wear of the 1920s (Lanvin copy)

1940s Open Midriff Evening Gown
Source: Lauren Bacall, To Have and Have Not
Materials have: heavy-ish rayon crepe in dark teal blue
Materials need: metal ring (try Home Depot); hopefully fresh tropical flowers for hair
Pattern: Draping from ebay image and basic blouse and skirt patterns from stash

nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (fall)

When I first saw Kendra's Brunswick three years ago, I was fascinated and puzzled. I'd never heard of such a thing before, but it sounded really neat and unusual. One of those "I wish I could have one" thoughts that stays with you although you don't make real plans for it. Then Katherine made hers, and there was a minor convocation of them at Williamsburg. I loved them. But this time, I think my knowledge and skills are sufficient to tackle it!

So I dived into research again. I found two primary informational sources online: Kendra's page on Brunswicks and Jesuits, and Brunswick jackets on Diary of a Mantua Maker. There are also a few Pinterest boards. But mostly I did a lot of searching of general 18th century images, and collecting possibles on my own board.

I immediately ran into the issue that the vast majority of information and pictures are 1760s, while I want to do 1780s. For a variety of reasons, but mostly that there are other things in the 1780s that interest me, but little about the 1760s.  Both Kendra and Cole took the B&T Brunswick class; their information, coming from the same source, seemed to imply that the Brunswick continued in popularity into the 1780s. But there was little indication of any differences from the 1760s ones, except for the lack of sleeve ruffles.  I got hung up on trying to prove that, though, for quite a while.

Lots more this way! )


nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
Group projects are fun. For me, it's also funny how some I want to do from the get-go, like the Plaid Project, and some I'm not too keen on, like Jampagne. Because usually there's no good reason for either. The Plaid project was a lot of work, none of the fancy accessories I'd planned were finished, I was sewing at the last minute, and had to bring all the heavy stuff for 1860s; but from the moment I saw the price on the bolt I knew I was in. Whereas I never really found inspiration for Jampagne and didn't really regret not getting anything together. And the 18th century court dress group... I was having so much fun, watching my friends page and see gorgeous dress after gorgeous dress claimed, and it only belatedly crossed my mind - "Hmm... I have no intention of doing this!" I honestly don't know why. It might be because I've just done a court dress; although it's for another country and the wrong period. It taught me a lot, and I don't imagine an 18th century gown would be much harder. I know I have the technical skills, and the fabric expense I can manage if I really want to; and I have seen several examples that I really did like. I'm just not feeling it!

But 1920s robe de style? As soon as I saw the title of Katherine's post, the little light bulb went "Ding!" and I was 95% on it. Then Lauren declared herself in, and that was that!

I've already decided that 1915/1916, the only years with full skirts, are the only years I'm really drawn to in the 1910s. And now with the "robe de style," it's a natural step to plump for the only full-skirted fashionable silhouette of the following decade!

Interestingly, in a recent installment of her blog series "The Myth of Chanel and the 1920s," [personal profile] chocolatepot had this to say about the term "robe de style":

'It's generally called the robe de style, because a) a few fashion plates label it as such, and b) we fashion historians love having specific names for specific styles of dress (as well as specific traits to pin to specific designers). But in the research I've done recently on the 1920s, it's become fairly clear to me that the vast majority of people and designers and fashion editors would refer to it as the "bouffant look"/the "full-skirted silhouette" or simply call them evening or afternoon dresses with various adjectives such as "romantic", "nostalgic", "old-fashioned", &c. Robe de style is not an anachronistic term, but it seems to me that calling every full-skirted 1920s dress a robe de style as though they were seen as unrelated to "ordinary" dress is not true to history.'

Interesting! For the purposes of the group, and its correspondence to the 18th century court dress, what we're calling the "robe de style" incorporates some kind of side hoop or pannier support in the skirt. I set up a Pinterest board (of course) to collect images and rapidly discovered that the term "robe de style" is indeed applied to all kinds of dresses, including some which, while they might have gathered skirts, clearly lack any kind of skirt support. Accordingly, I limited my board to only those which demonstrate that support, either clearly (with visible lines or even the boning itself, through sheer fabric), or by inference, in the cases of very full skirts that don't obviously "break" over the hoop.

Even with this self-imposed limit, I found a LOT of images. There are over 100 on the board, and well over half of that number are originals. I saw some patterns as I was pinning:

* The robe de style/pannier dress is dated throughout the 1920s, with some examples from the late 1910s and at least two from the 1930s.
* There are three primary types of fabrics used: net/organza, taffeta, and satin.  Note that all three textiles usually have body to them. Conclusion: the pannier dress works best with a fabric that floats on and over the skirt support, not draping and hanging heavily from it like a charmeuse or crepe. Net, particularly the embroidered examples from Boué Soeurs, is somewhat an exception; but also in these gowns the skirt support itself is supposed to be visible through the sheer.
* This is not limited to evening wear. It is not limited to either dark or light colors for evening.
* Skirts tend to be fairly long, though not touching the ground.
* The styling does modify throughout the decade, with bodice style and skirt length, but it's fairly subtle.

Now... what am I planning? I'm not sure yet; there are several ideas I'm mulling over. I REALLY like this one:



It's a Lanvin gown from Fall/Winter 1926-27, and must have been an extremely popular model.



The Metropolitan Museum of Art has two versions, both in black silk (here and here), and Kent State has one in black velvet.

I really love the silhouette on this one. The full a-line skirt is my favorite shape, and while the dress waist is dropped slightly and curved, the beautiful beading follows the natural waist even in the back. Seriously, I think this would be pretty amazing on my figure. And plus, this is one of the few originals that has a picture of the under-dress, in this case with the soft pannier line given by a curve of horsehair (I think) on each side.

I also love the fact that the pink dress shows Lanvin did models in different colors. The pink is gorgeous, but I'm not sure I'll find it exactly; and I'm not sure I want to do another pink dress for the gala. I DO have a big lack of blue in my costuming wardrobe, though, so maybe that would work?

So what's the problem? The beading! I really haven't ever beaded anything before. A project of this magnitude is not the best place to start. But the Met pictures are clear, and make it look beguilingly do-able.


That one is far and away the one that stood out the most, but there are still others I liked.

The sleeves on this are awesome, and I'd love it in a rich jewel-tone color. The trim is very close to what Katherine already did with her green robe de style, though.



The lines of this one are just gorgeous. But *gasp* it also has beading on it!





nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (busy nothings)
Jen had a great post on Facebook vs. blogs vs. LJ (DW still really isn't where the costumers are), and I realized I've been contributing to LJ being quiet. I don't post often, for one of two basic reasons:

1. I feel I have nothing to say, or no pictures to illustrate it with, and so posting would waste everyone's time.
2. I have SO MUCH to say that there's not enough time to properly address it.
2.a. Even when I don't have much to say, once I start writing it's hard to stop and I end up using up time that was allocated elsewhere. Lack of self-control in writing!

So I need to get over that. Hence why I'm posting now.

I've been working super hard on my HSF Flora & Fauna entry: an 1860s sheer dress, made from the same printed flower fabric that Katherine used years ago, except in the pink and gray colorway. It's so pretty! It won't be done *quite* on time, primarily because:

I've been cast in a production of "Hello, Dolly" that will be performed at the end of August. I'm ensemble, but Dolly has a LOT of hard singing and what I'm told will be a lot of dancing. (I really want to do some difficult tap dancing!)  Rehearsals just started, but as a rule they're three nights a week: Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. So since I was singing last night, and will be again tonight, I won't be able to put in the hem, trim the sleeves, and sew a few hooks. (Or finish the seams, but that's not critical.) I'm so close to being done with it, though! And I love it! It's so light and fluffy and pretty.

Back to Dolly: I sing first soprano, but I'm not a true operatic soprano; I tend to absolutely top out at a D (maybe D sharp) two octaves above middle C in warmups.  That C is as high as I've sung in choral music to this point. But Dolly? There's a D flat. Whee!  I'll be warming up well for rehearsals. I think there's only one other lady who's doing anything above a B, which is good. With two of us there should be enough volume to balance the rest of the cast and (live) orchestra, and neither of us is an overpowering (true high) soprano who will dominate the whole thing.

I'll be so glad when everything for Costume College is done. I need to do the 1690s court dress bodice for the next HSF, Literature. I still don't have any other materials purchased; I was going to get some lace, but the one that looked the most plausible was cream instead of white. I just need to decide on that, though. The current crisis is what to do for the ermine. I've been planning on velvet, trying to avoid the hassle of fur. But sourcing the velvet has turned into a much bigger hassle than the fur itself. And it probably won't be cheaper than fur, and it sure won't look like fur. It'll look nice, but not like fur.

I've gotten rabbit fur trim in the LA garment district in the past. It's only about 1" wide, and I need 2-3" wide, so I'd rather not double it. But if that isn't possible:

* Anyone know where to get fur trim online? Google is worthless - "fur trim" just turns up various garments and footwear.
* Is wider trim available? That would be the best choice.
* Or do you have a really good quality fake fur to recommend? I'd rather use polyester velvet than cheap-looking and -feeling fake fur.

At this point, the only thing I know I can do is get rabbit skins from Tandy Leather and make my own trim. It'll be a lot of work, and the skins themselves are already $10 apiece. And I'll try to get to the Dallas stores on Friday and see if a miracle is waiting there.  I found the perfect things for all of Maid Marian there; maybe it will happen.


Another undecided issue is the petticoat. It's a large-patterned white with gold brocade/damask/jacquard/whatever the stores call it.  I've got several options, in widely varying weights, beauty, and prices. What is a good width for a petticoat of this period? I'm also trying to figure out how much material will reasonably be hidden underneath the skirt, even if I "bustle" it for necessity's sake.




In other news, I've finally planted some things in my retaining wall garden. Bro. No. 1 let me know that a church across from his workplace was having a plant sale that benefited their missions.  He'd already gotten several things and said the plants all looked very good, and the prices were on par with other retail nurseries. Plus the money was going to the church. :)  Mostly they had a LOT of roses, both hybrid teas and others. I got there last Sunday, when they'd just sold out of the yellow roses, so I got two Snowfires. They're red, with white outside the petals. So pretty! Also, the snowfires grown in Tyler, Texas, famous for its roses. They're blooming away already.  Hybrid teas are awesome; they're fine with the heat here, as long as they're watered, and bloom into December until it finally gets too cold.  I also got three armeria/false sea thrift, and three marigolds. Yay for flowers!


nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Sewing Bunny)
First, the Other I know about:
Read more... )

Whew! That's a lot to do! And that's not even the costuming. Starting with DFWCG's 2012 schedule:

DFWCG 2012 )


Costume College )
So in rough order from what I need to just ideas:

1. 1860s Not Mourning dress
2. 1860s floral sheer dress
3. c. 1940 evening dress
4. 1915 Edwardian - skin out
5. Pink linen slip dress
6. Red Lensman
7. Pool party something
8. Red-flowered rayonn 1940s dress
9. 1930s fairy-print linen 

Add this on to the list from the top, and I think I'll be kept quite busy!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (hat)
First, Saturday was a crazy weather day. Let me explain:

2012-01-22 Meacham


To sum up:
* I started the day with fog and near 100% humidity, plus a steady south wind.
* By 12 noon the fog had disappeared, humidity had plummeted, and the wind was rising and shifting.
* By 2 p.m. it was 77°F with very low humidity, and the wind was from the southwest, steady at 31 mph and gusting to 45 mph. (!)*
* By 5 p.m. the wind was full from the west, still warm and dry, but the sun was dimming. The wind picked up a lot of dust southwest of us, and the western sky had a distinctly reddish tinge.
* By 6 p.m., due to the dust, visibility had dropped from 10 miles (a perfectly clear day) to 4 miles.
* By 8 p.m., the wind was from the northwest, still strong and gusty but dropping, and humidity rising once more. Temperature slowly falling.


So in one day, we go from warmish for January and wet (and windy), to quite warm and dry (and VERY windy), to very warm and dry and dusty (and still windy), to cool and damp (and still more wind). Honestly, I'm used to change, but this is one of the few days in which "If you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes" really seems to apply. As far as I can tell we had either two weather fronts move through or off, or one front and a dry line, in less than 12 hours. Even without precipitation, the wind directions and humidity changes are pretty clear.

* I had the windows open, because it was warm and I love the wind. I admit that 45 mph is a bit much inside the house! The only real casualty was a light bulb, when the wind blew one of my vanity lamps over and off the dressing table. The bulb didn't break, but the filament did.




Second thing - I've got so much to plan! I didn't make it to the DFWCG planning meeting on Saturday, but a terrific schedule for the year was decided on. Including a Dallas/Fort Worth area costuming retreat at the end of July! And speaking of that, I realized I need to send in my Costume College info if I'm doing that (which I really want to), and really plan out my costumes and sewing for the year. So a post on that will be coming up soon!

If I can ever manage to upload pictures, I've got lots of show of the house, plus the costumed tea the Guild had last Saturday, at which I met [livejournal.com profile] padawansguide for the first time in real life. :D 


As for my two minor victories: In the last week, I found two Somethings that had been inexplicably missing for months!  One was my two pattern boxes with ALL of my regular-small-envelope patterns. This includes all my modern stuff, most of my 1860s patterns, and nearly all of my vintage patterns. They went missing in the move and I couldn't find them anywhere.  I finally found them in the stack of boxes with school books and papers; someone had put them in a bond paper box, then stacked loose leaf papers on top, so just taking the top off the box made it look like a full box of paper. Yay!

The second find: All 9 paperbacks of C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner series.  When I organized and boxed almost all of my books last February (while iced in for a week), I set them aside because I'd acquired the next "trilogy" set (nos. 10-12), but wanted to re-read the whole series to refresh it in my mind. And somehow I lost track of where I put them! So despite intermittent, frantic hauling around and poking through the boxes all summer (in the heat of the garage YAY not really), I never did find them. And although afraid to look, Sunday on a whim I pulled out my boxes again and finally found them. They were all there! I have no idea how I overlooked them, but SO MUCH RELIEF. I was really getting afraid they'd been thrown away sometime. Nine paperbacks are a bit bulky to overlook for a year!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (hat)
First, Saturday was a crazy weather day. Let me explain:

2012-01-22 Meacham


To sum up:
* I started the day with fog and near 100% humidity, plus a steady south wind.
* By 12 noon the fog had disappeared, humidity had plummeted, and the wind was rising and shifting.
* By 2 p.m. it was 77°F with very low humidity, and the wind was from the southwest, steady at 31 mph and gusting to 45 mph. (!)*
* By 5 p.m. the wind was full from the west, still warm and dry, but the sun was dimming. The wind picked up a lot of dust southwest of us, and the western sky had a distinctly reddish tinge.
* By 6 p.m., due to the dust, visibility had dropped from 10 miles (a perfectly clear day) to 4 miles.
* By 8 p.m., the wind was from the northwest, still strong and gusty but dropping, and humidity rising once more. Temperature slowly falling.


So in one day, we go from warmish for January and wet (and windy), to quite warm and dry (and VERY windy), to very warm and dry and dusty (and still windy), to cool and damp (and still more wind). Honestly, I'm used to change, but this is one of the few days in which "If you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes" really seems to apply. As far as I can tell we had either two weather fronts move through or off, or one front and a dry line, in less than 12 hours. Even without precipitation, the wind directions and humidity changes are pretty clear.

* I had the windows open, because it was warm and I love the wind. I admit that 45 mph is a bit much inside the house! The only real casualty was a light bulb, when the wind blew one of my vanity lamps over and off the dressing table. The bulb didn't break, but the filament did.




Second thing - I've got so much to plan! I didn't make it to the DFWCG planning meeting on Saturday, but a terrific schedule for the year was decided on. Including a Dallas/Fort Worth area costuming retreat at the end of July! And speaking of that, I realized I need to send in my Costume College info if I'm doing that (which I really want to), and really plan out my costumes and sewing for the year. So a post on that will be coming up soon!

If I can ever manage to upload pictures, I've got lots of show of the house, plus the costumed tea the Guild had last Saturday, at which I met [personal profile] padawansguide for the first time in real life. :D 


As for my two minor victories: In the last week, I found two Somethings that had been inexplicably missing for months!  One was my two pattern boxes with ALL of my regular-small-envelope patterns. This includes all my modern stuff, most of my 1860s patterns, and nearly all of my vintage patterns. They went missing in the move and I couldn't find them anywhere.  I finally found them in the stack of boxes with school books and papers; someone had put them in a bond paper box, then stacked loose leaf papers on top, so just taking the top off the box made it look like a full box of paper. Yay!

The second find: All 9 paperbacks of C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner series.  When I organized and boxed almost all of my books last February (while iced in for a week), I set them aside because I'd acquired the next "trilogy" set (nos. 10-12), but wanted to re-read the whole series to refresh it in my mind. And somehow I lost track of where I put them! So despite intermittent, frantic hauling around and poking through the boxes all summer (in the heat of the garage YAY not really), I never did find them. And although afraid to look, Sunday on a whim I pulled out my boxes again and finally found them. They were all there! I have no idea how I overlooked them, but SO MUCH RELIEF. I was really getting afraid they'd been thrown away sometime. Nine paperbacks are a bit bulky to overlook for a year!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1860s)
Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jenthompson, I settled on fancy dress for the Gala.  No surprise that I'm coming home to the 1860s!  I've always loved how those hoops look with short skirts, too, and this is a great opportunity.

On the left, The Star!



I love the colors. White makes me glow, and those medium blues supposedly bring out my eyes. Plus it's almost ridiculously simple in design, except for the sleeves.

The fabrics I have not pinned down yet.  The underskirt and blue look like silk moire.  Nowhere to be found at the moment, at least not in those colors, and while I'm not a starving college student I'm not willing to spend $30/yd yet.  Still, I'd like something with texture to it.  When I posted over at the Sewing Academy, Jessamyn suggested silk/cotton satin from Thai Silks.  She said it's lovely stuff and good to work with.  At $11/yd, I'm willing to try it!  I'm okay with taffeta for the blue, and the overskirt looks like taffeta as well.

So what about the sleeves?  What makes it hard is that they're drawn with drape AND body.  1860s silks were not very drapey; chiffon and gauze, at least in their present limp forms, were not really used.  One person used two layers of silk gauze for similar open "angel" sleeves; that would work, since those open sleeves will flow.  My concern is that this variation has more material, and will collapse under its own weight instead of being cloudlike.  The other sheer silk I can think of, organza, has way too MUCH body and would look like a big poof.  Then there's leno, or gazar maybe, but I just don't know.  What about a silk/cotton voile? Except voile is about the limpest stuff I've ever seen. Silk/linen might work, but 1860s wear pretty much abandoned linen in all forms. Help!

As for the stars, I need a new design. I don't want to cover cardboard with aluminum foil; it looks so obvious! But someone suggested Dresden foil, which I'd never heard of but seems just perfect.  Of course I can't find ALL the different sizes of stars (most are too small) and no diamonds at all.  I like these starbursts in the middle best. At 3.5", they're doable for the biggest decorations.



And these shooting stars are 3 1/2" long as well. There are smaller ones, too.




Any ideas? This particular design area is not my expertise! Also, gold or silver?
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (1860s)
Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] jenthompson, I settled on fancy dress for the Gala.  No surprise that I'm coming home to the 1860s!  I've always loved how those hoops look with short skirts, too, and this is a great opportunity.

On the left, The Star!



I love the colors. White makes me glow, and those medium blues supposedly bring out my eyes. Plus it's almost ridiculously simple in design, except for the sleeves.

The fabrics I have not pinned down yet.  The underskirt and blue look like silk moire.  Nowhere to be found at the moment, at least not in those colors, and while I'm not a starving college student I'm not willing to spend $30/yd yet.  Still, I'd like something with texture to it.  When I posted over at the Sewing Academy, Jessamyn suggested silk/cotton satin from Thai Silks.  She said it's lovely stuff and good to work with.  At $11/yd, I'm willing to try it!  I'm okay with taffeta for the blue, and the overskirt looks like taffeta as well.

So what about the sleeves?  What makes it hard is that they're drawn with drape AND body.  1860s silks were not very drapey; chiffon and gauze, at least in their present limp forms, were not really used.  One person used two layers of silk gauze for similar open "angel" sleeves; that would work, since those open sleeves will flow.  My concern is that this variation has more material, and will collapse under its own weight instead of being cloudlike.  The other sheer silk I can think of, organza, has way too MUCH body and would look like a big poof.  Then there's leno, or gazar maybe, but I just don't know.  What about a silk/cotton voile? Except voile is about the limpest stuff I've ever seen. Silk/linen might work, but 1860s wear pretty much abandoned linen in all forms. Help!

As for the stars, I need a new design. I don't want to cover cardboard with aluminum foil; it looks so obvious! But someone suggested Dresden foil, which I'd never heard of but seems just perfect.  Of course I can't find ALL the different sizes of stars (most are too small) and no diamonds at all.  I like these starbursts in the middle best. At 3.5", they're doable for the biggest decorations.



And these shooting stars are 3 1/2" long as well. There are smaller ones, too.




Any ideas? This particular design area is not my expertise! Also, gold or silver?
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (wonderfulness)
I got tired of waffling about feedsack fabric. There's so much cute stuff out there, it's incredibly hard to choose. And this isn't a big-deal project. Remember the WWKD? thing - What Would Katherine Do?  She just does it! And that's how it gets done.

This one has all my favorite colors in it (well, grass green is better than lime green, but oh well), the price was one of the cheapest out there ($7), and it was a hefty piece for a feedsack (34" x 44").  I doubt I'll regret it, while I WILL regret wasting time when it's mid-July and I have nothing done.

 

Sometimes I think it looks 40s, and sometimes I think it looks late-50s-almost-mod-60s.  You know, tepee-shaped motels. :p  Oh, well!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (wonderfulness)
I got tired of waffling about feedsack fabric. There's so much cute stuff out there, it's incredibly hard to choose. And this isn't a big-deal project. Remember the WWKD? thing - What Would Katherine Do?  She just does it! And that's how it gets done.

This one has all my favorite colors in it (well, grass green is better than lime green, but oh well), the price was one of the cheapest out there ($7), and it was a hefty piece for a feedsack (34" x 44").  I doubt I'll regret it, while I WILL regret wasting time when it's mid-July and I have nothing done.

 

Sometimes I think it looks 40s, and sometimes I think it looks late-50s-almost-mod-60s.  You know, tepee-shaped motels. :p  Oh, well!
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Chill...)
Two weeks ago tonight, we had a fire in the fireplace, watching one of the most significant ice storms in the last decade.

Tonight I'm not only barefooted but barelegged in my usually-chilly house, watching a truly nasty-looking mess of severe thunderstorms barrel inexorably toward us.

It's the 5th or 6th day in a row with highs in the 60s or 70s, and   There are lots of yellow severe thunderstorm warning boxes up on all the counties to our southwest, west, and northwest. Latest word is some are capable of producing golf-ball-sized hail and 70+ mph winds.  (The red boxes for tornado warnings are all up and over the Red River into Oklahoma, although the whole area is under a tornado watch.)  It's early in the year for this sort of thing, but neither ice nor ordinary severe weather is that unusual.  It's the rapid change that's noteworthy.  (But also typical.)

I wonder if we'll lose power.  I was going to post pictures about my Terrifying Try at Fitting Trousers, but that may not happen tonight.

It's also entirely possible we won't get a drop of rain.  (We've had about 1.5" since December.  That's dry.)
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Chill...)
Two weeks ago tonight, we had a fire in the fireplace, watching one of the most significant ice storms in the last decade.

Tonight I'm not only barefooted but barelegged in my usually-chilly house, watching a truly nasty-looking mess of severe thunderstorms barrel inexorably toward us.

It's the 5th or 6th day in a row with highs in the 60s or 70s, and   There are lots of yellow severe thunderstorm warning boxes up on all the counties to our southwest, west, and northwest. Latest word is some are capable of producing golf-ball-sized hail and 70+ mph winds.  (The red boxes for tornado warnings are all up and over the Red River into Oklahoma, although the whole area is under a tornado watch.)  It's early in the year for this sort of thing, but neither ice nor ordinary severe weather is that unusual.  It's the rapid change that's noteworthy.  (But also typical.)

I wonder if we'll lose power.  I was going to post pictures about my Terrifying Try at Fitting Trousers, but that may not happen tonight.

It's also entirely possible we won't get a drop of rain.  (We've had about 1.5" since December.  That's dry.)

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nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
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