nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
It's just a non-stop day of routine. Early morning, long day of work, rush home to make and eat dinner and deal with household stuff (today's edition: mail, email, power outage, and Modcloth shipment), rush off to long university-level rehearsal, and get back in time for the bedtime routine. Not bad, but little extra to write about.

At least we're getting some rain now. First precipitation in about 30 days. And on that day back in January, we had over 3", when our January average is 2". THAT is why, boys and girls, "average" does not equal "normal". Average may be 2" of rain in January, but normal can mean 29 bone dry days wrapped around 2 days of a second Great Flood. :p
nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
Tomrrow's forecast:

  • Sunday
    Rain and sleet likely between 7am and 1pm, then snow, freezing rain, and sleet. Temperature falling to around 34 by 4pm. North wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Little or no ice accumulation expected. New snow and sleet accumulation of less than a half inch possible.
  • Sunday Night
    Snow, freezing rain, and sleet before 7pm. Low around 27. North wind 5 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. Little or no ice accumulation expected. New snow and sleet accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

    It seems the first week of February is a good time for ice or snow or fun things like that. Three years ago, we had a major ice storm, three days that didn't get above 23°F, and then snow. That was the week I couldn't go in to work for four days. And that weekend was the Super Bowl here, in Arlington. :p 

    In comparison, December's storm definitely topped 2011's; but that's a result of the sheer quantity of ice. There was less in 2011, but the temperature stayed so low it just never melted, and it didn't lose its grit.  But this December we got way more, especially on my side of town. And while temperatures did warm up after the first day, the ice was so much deeper that only the top layer melted - which then re-froze every night into a smooth sheet. I've never seen ice that thick and slippery. (And it became cobblestone ice on the roads.)

    These winter storms have a habit of adding to my wardrobe. After 2011 I got nice insulated winter boots. Now I'm adding ice cleats to my wishlist! :D

    Did I mention that Friday's high was 78°F? It was very pleasant. :)
  • nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)


    Besides being a weather nerd, this perfectly illustrates another reason I watch the forecast so much. How would I know tomorrow to wear a short sleeve cotton dress and cardigan to work, and the next a heavy wool coat, a warm outfit underneath that involves leggings, and insulated rain boots?

    In other news, the Christmas cantata is Saturday and Sunday. Rehearsals scheduled Thursday and Friday nights... for now. [ominously, with plenty of eyebrow] 

    You're invited to begin the Christmas season with Christ Chapel’s annual Christmas Cantata, “Sing A Song Of Christmas.” Featuring majestic arrangements of traditional Christmas carols, the Cantata will tell the story of Christ’s birth through beautiful music.

    In addition to hearing the Cantata Choir and Sanctuary Orchestra, we will also be blessed with a very special carol arrangement by our children’s choir, MusicPraise, and by our Youth Bells.

    * Saturday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m
    * Sunday, Dec. 8 at 9:15 a.m., 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.


    We are going to stream video of the 2012 Cantata online for 24 hours! Beginning Thursday, Dec. 5 at 6 p.m., you can click here to watch last year's service online until 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6.

    You may also watch the 2013 Cantata live on our website during all four service times by clicking here.

    [All times CST.]

    Wow!

    8 March 2012 12:48 pm
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)
    Remember this?  16°F temperature drop in 1 hour by the clock.  Well, we've just blown through that.




    Yep, that's 21 degrees in 1 hour, from 11 AM to noon.  Yikes!!!

    Not only that, but after a night that barely hit 67°, with gentle south/eastern winds, we've gone to cold north winds gusting above 30 mph and cold blowing rain.  What a yucky day! Naturally, it's my busy day - work, then chiropractor, then dinner, then voice lesson, then choir rehearsal, then practice of two special ensemble pieces (partially via Skype) for the concert tomorrow night. *dies*  At least I dressed [mostly] practically. (I suspect I'll want my real coat instead of the trench...)

    I knew it was supposed to be chilly with rain today, but I honestly did not expect anything this abrupt or extreme. Wow!
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (hat)
    First, Saturday was a crazy weather day. Let me explain:

    2012-01-22 Meacham


    To sum up:
    * I started the day with fog and near 100% humidity, plus a steady south wind.
    * By 12 noon the fog had disappeared, humidity had plummeted, and the wind was rising and shifting.
    * By 2 p.m. it was 77°F with very low humidity, and the wind was from the southwest, steady at 31 mph and gusting to 45 mph. (!)*
    * By 5 p.m. the wind was full from the west, still warm and dry, but the sun was dimming. The wind picked up a lot of dust southwest of us, and the western sky had a distinctly reddish tinge.
    * By 6 p.m., due to the dust, visibility had dropped from 10 miles (a perfectly clear day) to 4 miles.
    * By 8 p.m., the wind was from the northwest, still strong and gusty but dropping, and humidity rising once more. Temperature slowly falling.


    So in one day, we go from warmish for January and wet (and windy), to quite warm and dry (and VERY windy), to very warm and dry and dusty (and still windy), to cool and damp (and still more wind). Honestly, I'm used to change, but this is one of the few days in which "If you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes" really seems to apply. As far as I can tell we had either two weather fronts move through or off, or one front and a dry line, in less than 12 hours. Even without precipitation, the wind directions and humidity changes are pretty clear.

    * I had the windows open, because it was warm and I love the wind. I admit that 45 mph is a bit much inside the house! The only real casualty was a light bulb, when the wind blew one of my vanity lamps over and off the dressing table. The bulb didn't break, but the filament did.




    Second thing - I've got so much to plan! I didn't make it to the DFWCG planning meeting on Saturday, but a terrific schedule for the year was decided on. Including a Dallas/Fort Worth area costuming retreat at the end of July! And speaking of that, I realized I need to send in my Costume College info if I'm doing that (which I really want to), and really plan out my costumes and sewing for the year. So a post on that will be coming up soon!

    If I can ever manage to upload pictures, I've got lots of show of the house, plus the costumed tea the Guild had last Saturday, at which I met [livejournal.com profile] padawansguide for the first time in real life. :D 


    As for my two minor victories: In the last week, I found two Somethings that had been inexplicably missing for months!  One was my two pattern boxes with ALL of my regular-small-envelope patterns. This includes all my modern stuff, most of my 1860s patterns, and nearly all of my vintage patterns. They went missing in the move and I couldn't find them anywhere.  I finally found them in the stack of boxes with school books and papers; someone had put them in a bond paper box, then stacked loose leaf papers on top, so just taking the top off the box made it look like a full box of paper. Yay!

    The second find: All 9 paperbacks of C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner series.  When I organized and boxed almost all of my books last February (while iced in for a week), I set them aside because I'd acquired the next "trilogy" set (nos. 10-12), but wanted to re-read the whole series to refresh it in my mind. And somehow I lost track of where I put them! So despite intermittent, frantic hauling around and poking through the boxes all summer (in the heat of the garage YAY not really), I never did find them. And although afraid to look, Sunday on a whim I pulled out my boxes again and finally found them. They were all there! I have no idea how I overlooked them, but SO MUCH RELIEF. I was really getting afraid they'd been thrown away sometime. Nine paperbacks are a bit bulky to overlook for a year!
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (hat)
    First, Saturday was a crazy weather day. Let me explain:

    2012-01-22 Meacham


    To sum up:
    * I started the day with fog and near 100% humidity, plus a steady south wind.
    * By 12 noon the fog had disappeared, humidity had plummeted, and the wind was rising and shifting.
    * By 2 p.m. it was 77°F with very low humidity, and the wind was from the southwest, steady at 31 mph and gusting to 45 mph. (!)*
    * By 5 p.m. the wind was full from the west, still warm and dry, but the sun was dimming. The wind picked up a lot of dust southwest of us, and the western sky had a distinctly reddish tinge.
    * By 6 p.m., due to the dust, visibility had dropped from 10 miles (a perfectly clear day) to 4 miles.
    * By 8 p.m., the wind was from the northwest, still strong and gusty but dropping, and humidity rising once more. Temperature slowly falling.


    So in one day, we go from warmish for January and wet (and windy), to quite warm and dry (and VERY windy), to very warm and dry and dusty (and still windy), to cool and damp (and still more wind). Honestly, I'm used to change, but this is one of the few days in which "If you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes" really seems to apply. As far as I can tell we had either two weather fronts move through or off, or one front and a dry line, in less than 12 hours. Even without precipitation, the wind directions and humidity changes are pretty clear.

    * I had the windows open, because it was warm and I love the wind. I admit that 45 mph is a bit much inside the house! The only real casualty was a light bulb, when the wind blew one of my vanity lamps over and off the dressing table. The bulb didn't break, but the filament did.




    Second thing - I've got so much to plan! I didn't make it to the DFWCG planning meeting on Saturday, but a terrific schedule for the year was decided on. Including a Dallas/Fort Worth area costuming retreat at the end of July! And speaking of that, I realized I need to send in my Costume College info if I'm doing that (which I really want to), and really plan out my costumes and sewing for the year. So a post on that will be coming up soon!

    If I can ever manage to upload pictures, I've got lots of show of the house, plus the costumed tea the Guild had last Saturday, at which I met [personal profile] padawansguide for the first time in real life. :D 


    As for my two minor victories: In the last week, I found two Somethings that had been inexplicably missing for months!  One was my two pattern boxes with ALL of my regular-small-envelope patterns. This includes all my modern stuff, most of my 1860s patterns, and nearly all of my vintage patterns. They went missing in the move and I couldn't find them anywhere.  I finally found them in the stack of boxes with school books and papers; someone had put them in a bond paper box, then stacked loose leaf papers on top, so just taking the top off the box made it look like a full box of paper. Yay!

    The second find: All 9 paperbacks of C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner series.  When I organized and boxed almost all of my books last February (while iced in for a week), I set them aside because I'd acquired the next "trilogy" set (nos. 10-12), but wanted to re-read the whole series to refresh it in my mind. And somehow I lost track of where I put them! So despite intermittent, frantic hauling around and poking through the boxes all summer (in the heat of the garage YAY not really), I never did find them. And although afraid to look, Sunday on a whim I pulled out my boxes again and finally found them. They were all there! I have no idea how I overlooked them, but SO MUCH RELIEF. I was really getting afraid they'd been thrown away sometime. Nine paperbacks are a bit bulky to overlook for a year!

    Brr!

    17 January 2012 10:50 am
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (winter stormy)
    It's been an incredibly mild winter so far. Except for a very low-20s (F) dip in early Deceember (much earlier than we usually get what passes for Serious Cold), this winter has been mild. More than a few days have been in the 60s, and several in the 70s in the last 30 days. That doesn't mean it still isn't winter. And a hallmark of Texas winter is Sudden Change.*

    This morning is probably the most striking example of a winter Sudden Change that I've documented. See the red circles:



    In the hour from 7 AM to 8 AM, the temperature dropped 16 degrees.  Sixteen!!!


    I've seen 20-30 degree temperature drops in the course of a morning, or an afternoon, or whenever a front hits.  That's spectacular enough, and leaves an unwary person in the position of going to work in comfortable shirt sleeves, and freezing on the way to the car in the evening. But 16 degrees in one hour is as sudden a drop as I've ever seen.  You can see from the blue circle that the wind had already shifted to the northwest, so the front had started coming in. The weather station just happened to catch the temperature extremes in its hourly recordings.

    The front isn't even that strong. We've stayed steady at 43° for several hours since then, and aren't supposed to get much below 30° tonight. It's just the speed that it came in with.

    Never a dull moment!

    * For once Wikipedia continues to fail me, but I do have another link. An apparently Texas term for a very strong, very fast-moving cold front is "Blue Norther." Just as with this morning. Sometimes it is visible as a low, very dense line of blue-gray-black clouds approaching from the north-northwest.  These are the fronts that bring dramatic 20-60° temperature drops in 24 hours. They often seem to come when the weather's been warm; and since both warm and winter-like weather can happen anywhere from October to April, it's easy to be caught by surprise.  In North Texas it's not usually severe, but I understand that in the Panhandle these fronts used to be (maybe still are) dreaded by ranchers. They can bring very heavy snow, and combined with the wind, can lead to the the deaths of many cattle.
    This is the closest picture I found in a fast interwebs survey to what I have seen and term "blue norther" clouds, although it doesn't actually show the leading edge - IMHO the most striking part. It does show some of the blue color.
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
    I didn't realize that this front, which has dropped us now into the upper 30s from the lower 70s, brought snow to Amarillo.  Not just any snow, either.  Blizzard!  12 inches and counting!  In less than a day; I'm not sure exactly how many hours.

    Huzzah for crazy March weather!  The Extreme Seesaw continues!
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Default)
    I didn't realize that this front, which has dropped us now into the upper 30s from the lower 70s, brought snow to Amarillo.  Not just any snow, either.  Blizzard!  12 inches and counting!  In less than a day; I'm not sure exactly how many hours.

    Huzzah for crazy March weather!  The Extreme Seesaw continues!
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
    No sewing tonight. Got a bad headache at work. Made it through the rest of the day, the drive home, and class, but now Mums is sending me to bed.

    I didn't get any studying done last night, either. Nor have I yet ordered that blasted textbook. Bah.

    I did read nearly an entire Fantasy & Science Fiction magazine, though, trying to get to Dickson's "St. Dragon and the George."  [livejournal.com profile] jordannamorgan, 'twas good and 'tis going on the wishlists.

    And I did at least mark the hem. Good, since it was more of a pain than I thought it'd be.  But because I have to go to bed I won't be finishing it tonight to wear tomorrow.


    Severe thunderstorm up on the Red River tonight - very large hail and potential tornado last I saw.  We largely missed out on yesterdays's unessential excitement, along with the essential rainfall.  Less than .5" in that whole mess of storms. Double Bah.  And Winter Rides Again tomorrow.  Tonight's low: 63.  Tomorrow's high: 62.  (Figure that one out.)  Temperature falling to 44 by 5 pm.

    Texas doesn't have a real Spring season.  It's called a couple of months of Extreme Weather Seesaw.
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
    No sewing tonight. Got a bad headache at work. Made it through the rest of the day, the drive home, and class, but now Mums is sending me to bed.

    I didn't get any studying done last night, either. Nor have I yet ordered that blasted textbook. Bah.

    I did read nearly an entire Fantasy & Science Fiction magazine, though, trying to get to Dickson's "St. Dragon and the George."  [livejournal.com profile] jordannamorgan, 'twas good and 'tis going on the wishlists.

    And I did at least mark the hem. Good, since it was more of a pain than I thought it'd be.  But because I have to go to bed I won't be finishing it tonight to wear tomorrow.


    Severe thunderstorm up on the Red River tonight - very large hail and potential tornado last I saw.  We largely missed out on yesterdays's unessential excitement, along with the essential rainfall.  Less than .5" in that whole mess of storms. Double Bah.  And Winter Rides Again tomorrow.  Tonight's low: 63.  Tomorrow's high: 62.  (Figure that one out.)  Temperature falling to 44 by 5 pm.

    Texas doesn't have a real Spring season.  It's called a couple of months of Extreme Weather Seesaw.
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Chill...)
    Two weeks ago tonight, we had a fire in the fireplace, watching one of the most significant ice storms in the last decade.

    Tonight I'm not only barefooted but barelegged in my usually-chilly house, watching a truly nasty-looking mess of severe thunderstorms barrel inexorably toward us.

    It's the 5th or 6th day in a row with highs in the 60s or 70s, and   There are lots of yellow severe thunderstorm warning boxes up on all the counties to our southwest, west, and northwest. Latest word is some are capable of producing golf-ball-sized hail and 70+ mph winds.  (The red boxes for tornado warnings are all up and over the Red River into Oklahoma, although the whole area is under a tornado watch.)  It's early in the year for this sort of thing, but neither ice nor ordinary severe weather is that unusual.  It's the rapid change that's noteworthy.  (But also typical.)

    I wonder if we'll lose power.  I was going to post pictures about my Terrifying Try at Fitting Trousers, but that may not happen tonight.

    It's also entirely possible we won't get a drop of rain.  (We've had about 1.5" since December.  That's dry.)
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Chill...)
    Two weeks ago tonight, we had a fire in the fireplace, watching one of the most significant ice storms in the last decade.

    Tonight I'm not only barefooted but barelegged in my usually-chilly house, watching a truly nasty-looking mess of severe thunderstorms barrel inexorably toward us.

    It's the 5th or 6th day in a row with highs in the 60s or 70s, and   There are lots of yellow severe thunderstorm warning boxes up on all the counties to our southwest, west, and northwest. Latest word is some are capable of producing golf-ball-sized hail and 70+ mph winds.  (The red boxes for tornado warnings are all up and over the Red River into Oklahoma, although the whole area is under a tornado watch.)  It's early in the year for this sort of thing, but neither ice nor ordinary severe weather is that unusual.  It's the rapid change that's noteworthy.  (But also typical.)

    I wonder if we'll lose power.  I was going to post pictures about my Terrifying Try at Fitting Trousers, but that may not happen tonight.

    It's also entirely possible we won't get a drop of rain.  (We've had about 1.5" since December.  That's dry.)
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
    [livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider posted a few days ago about seasons, and it got me thinking.  What consitute seasons?  Is it just a big enough annual temperature swing?  Or is it having four mostly-distinct seasons?  Because my corner of Texas certainly qualifies as having seasons for the first, but not for the second.  Unless the accepted measure of "spring" and "fall" are different than mine.  Ironically, for all my tolerance of heat, I have a very narrow comfortable range; there are very few spring and fall days that satisfy me.

    Ramble ramble ramble )
    nuranar: Hortense Bonaparte. La reine Hortense sous une tonnelle à Aix-les-Bains (1813) by Antoine Jean Duclaux. (Nhi Vanye i Chya)
    [livejournal.com profile] estelyn_strider posted a few days ago about seasons, and it got me thinking.  What consitute seasons?  Is it just a big enough annual temperature swing?  Or is it having four mostly-distinct seasons?  Because my corner of Texas certainly qualifies as having seasons for the first, but not for the second.  Unless the accepted measure of "spring" and "fall" are different than mine.  Ironically, for all my tolerance of heat, I have a very narrow comfortable range; there are very few spring and fall days that satisfy me.

    Ramble ramble ramble )

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